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BuzzFeed, Find Your New Favorite Thing

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    “The secret to creating the illusion of a fuller behind — without using buttock enhancing shapewear, which is also an option — is in your back pockets. Wide pockets that are placed lower on the behind (that is, further away from your waistline) give the illusion of fullness, while narrow back pockets (or none at all) will only enhance your problem.”

    LINK: Tim Gunn Explains How To Combat "Flat Ass Syndrome"

    "The secret to creating the illusion of a fuller behind — without using buttock enhancing shapewear, which is also an option — is in your back pockets. Wide pockets that are placed lower on the behind (that is, further away from your waistline) give the illusion of fullness, while narrow back pockets (or none at all) will only enhance your problem."


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    Or at least, footwear just generally.

    "Chanel" Uggs

    "Chanel" Uggs

    Source: loveitsomuch.com

    Jimmy Choo Uggs

    Jimmy Choo Uggs

    Jimmy Choo rarely lets us down. This collaboration was the most egregious exception.

    Source: ioutletonline.com

    Embroidered Uggs

    Embroidered Uggs

    Source: ncunaku.blogspot.com

    Lace-up Uggs

    Lace-up Uggs

    Source: media-cache-ec4.pinterest.com


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    She can wear toilet paper as a scarf and still look more stylish than anyone ever.

    She can wear a toilet seat guard around her face and make it look good.

    She can wear a toilet seat guard around her face and make it look good.

    This is the May 2013 issue of W.

    Source: designscene.net

    She can spend a day sleeping in the MOMA as part of a performance artwork and it's cool instead of eye roll-y.

    She can spend a day sleeping in the MOMA as part of a performance artwork and it's cool instead of eye roll-y.

    Titled "The Maybe," the piece just involves Tilda randomly spending a day here and there sleeping in a glass box at the Museum of Modern Art. It makes so much sense because she's not a social media whore, and one of her best looks is pajamas.

    Via: Richard Drew / AP

    She can wear her pajamas on a red carpet and look better than anyone else there.

    She can wear her pajamas on a red carpet and look better than anyone else there.

    Via: John Shearer / Getty Images

    Also, she can wear all-white without looking like she broke out of a mental ward.

    Also, she can wear all-white without looking like she broke out of a mental ward.

    This jumpsuit is totally strange and she just owns it.

    Via: Lucas Jackson / Reuters


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  • 04/17/13--10:42: Death To The Fashion Collab
  • Everyone and their cat is doing a fashion collaboration these days. Enough!

    Kate Bosworth at Coachella in her Topshop line.

    Via: Rocstar/Premiere/CPR/FAMEFLYNET

    Kate Bosworth is doing a "festival" line for Topshop and all it makes me feel is emptiness. And exhaustion. I've already analyzed Coachella's worst trends this week and I'm still exhausted from it, and covering this BosShop line is already wearing me out. Because I just can't breathlessly enthuse over another one of these collaborations, I just can't.

    Bloggers like me used to get giddy over any and ALL fashion collaborations. Some elite European designer would sign on to do a line for H&M or Target and then everyone on the fashion internet would freak out about how OMG we'll be able to afford Lanvin and Margiela and Alexander McQueen (or at least, sell it on eBay for some ridiculous markup). Even though we were really just buying slightly specialized H&M or Target clothes, fashion land managed to convince us we were getting the very McQueen or whatever label itself. Even Kate Moss for Topshop was a treat, in the early days of collabs. The line was cool because she's always been cool and when Opening Ceremony sold it in New York it only became even cooler because everything Opening Ceremony does is cool (*shakes fist at OC's unerring coolness*).

    But that was then — the glorious days of 2008, when there weren't a million unnecessary collaborations with everyone with some connection to the fashion industry, be it divine talent or just that they wear clothes.

    Now we have Kate Bosworth doing music festival clothes for Topshop. I love Topshop. I think Kate Bosworth has great style! She wears the hell out of Jil Sander! I absolutely love looking at her red carpet pics. But this line is downright fraught, because:

    1. Kate Bosworth doesn't need to "design" (read: put her name on to pretend she created) clothes. She's first and foremost an actress — a fashionable one, but still an actress. And that's good! She should keep doing that! Because in an industry where people are famous for nothing more than being photographed wearing outfits, it's refreshing when style icons actually have a profession/talent to back up their fame.

    2. 90% of people look terrible at music festivals. This is the point of music festivals. You get to show up looking like a complete wacko because you're going to spend the day dancing and making duckface and getting drinks spilled on you and sweating and touching other sweaty people. Music festival outfits are throwaway clothes. Use once and destroy. Is that something Bosworth wants to be part of her fashion legacy?

    3. Topshop is already one giant music festival line. Believe me, if I want some a tight dress I can't wear to work with a weird pattern on it that won't cost a lot of money, I already know to look at Topshop. Ditto: Nasty Gal but Topshop was first and has way more options that are guaranteed to cover one's crotch, so.

    And this isn't the only unnecessary collaboration of late. Target just launched a line by stylist Kate Young that was really disappointing. And yet: Kate Young is great! Target is great! But Target was not the Will.i.am to Kate Youngs's Britney Spears. Scream and shout but you don't have to let it out at all. Forcing a line like that only stands to hurt each collaborater — Target looks like it's running out of partners and Kate Young looks like she's so eager to launch a line she can't bother to find a company that will help her do one that does justice to her talents. She could have Rachel Zoe'd it and put out a line that was all her own, at a higher price point and of better quality that stayed on the sales floor for seasons rather than just a month or so. (Snooki has multiple product lines of her own — Kate Young can definitely do it, too.)

    And let's look at Rihanna's River Island line: all it did was give the press 12,000 excuses to make fun of Rihanna. (I'd argue that actually worked in the line's favor since it made it ironically cool, but that was a fluke outcome and I might be the only person who feels that way.) The collab gave Rihanna and River Island a lot of press, but all it did was contribute to the already overcrowded canon of ever disposable, borderline unwearable High Street clothing.

    Even the collaborations with legit talented designers are getting harder to get excited about. The few labels who have refrained from doing cheaper one-off lines that would be worth enthusing over would probably never do them anyway (Givenchy or Celine, for instance). But the problem with these designer lines is that everyone who looks at fashion knows where the pieces have come from — it's almost impossible to wear an item from a designer collaboration and maintain a cool air of mystery about your look. And isn't it cooler to wear a bunch of things of unrecognizable provenance than a bunch of things everyone who follows fashion can recognize instantly?

    So, here's an idea: no more collaborations. At least for a year. Ideally two. Let us miss them, at least. It's like when Lady Gaga had to take time off. Don't we miss her now instead of rolling our eyes at her Terry Richardson photos all the time?

    And instead of hiring celebrities to put their names on random collections, just put them in ad campaigns. It will get just as much buzz as any line you might have them "design." You can make videos of the photo shoots and everything! There's plenty of internet mileage to get out of a campaign.

    Lastly, look at Zara. For all the obviously knocked off stuff they sell, they also have plenty of random generally nice-looking items. And it's a store that has zero collaborations and always has covetable stuff. It's one of those few places where you can get something neat for cheap and people will go, "Great jacket! Who's it by?" and you can gleefully say, "Zara!" taking pride in your thrifty ways.

    Topshop, H&M, Target, etc. all have fashion caché at this point. They don't need random collaborations to maintain it.

    Kate at Coachella again. Is this part of her Topshop line too? Maybe. Does it make you want to buy the line?

    Via: Premiere/CPR/Rocstar/FAMEFLYNET


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    Do you forgive him?

    LINK: The Person Who Invented The Word "Fashionista" Is Sorry

    Do you forgive him?


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    The FBI is using the Boylston Street store's footage to help identify suspects in the case.

    LINK: Lord & Taylor Surveillance Video May Provide Clues In Boston Bombing

    The FBI is using the Boylston Street store's footage to help identify suspects in the case.


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    What could be more fascinating than watching two of the world's fiercest models make food? Nothing.

    Did you know Jourdan Dunn has an internet cooking show? Well, she does! And she had Cara Delevigne on to help her cook in the new episode.

    Did you know Jourdan Dunn has an internet cooking show? Well, she does! And she had Cara Delevigne on to help her cook in the new episode.

    Cara is the Jennifer Lawrence of models.

    Source: gifsforum.com

    Cara told Jourdan she's capable of cooking toast and baked beans. Jourdan was like, "Well I'm going to teach you to make shrimp tempura." There was much rejoicing.

    Cara told Jourdan she's capable of cooking toast and baked beans. Jourdan was like, "Well I'm going to teach you to make shrimp tempura." There was much rejoicing.

    Source: gifsforum.com

    Jourdan was like, "I need that bowl for batter!" and Cara was like, "But no, I'm playing!"

    Jourdan was like, "I need that bowl for batter!" and Cara was like, "But no, I'm playing!"

    Source: gifsforum.com

    Then Jourdan put some soy sauce in a bowl with some ketchup and Cara made a face.

    Then Jourdan put some soy sauce in a bowl with some ketchup and Cara made a face.

    Source: gifsforum.com


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    If you're going to take your husband shopping, make sure he's well-fed and hydrated, for one.

    Source: bravotv.com

    The Rachel Zoe Project has many themes, like: "fashion is life"; "materialism FTW"; "catch phrases are really important"; "L.A.'s weather is always better than New York's". But mostly, this is a show about love. And not just the love between Rachel and purses and caftans, and the love between Rodger and leather jewelry, but also, the love between Rachel and Rodger and now Skyler. Let's take an in-depth look at the rules for that special kind of domesticity that blends so seamlessly with Rachel's professional life, as seen on the latest episode.

    The episode opens with a fun warm-up scene of the girls at RZ HQ giggling about something other than the fact that they have no lives because they work for RZ Inc! Ha ha! Here, they're only chuckling over a tangential consequence to working for RZ Inc. and therefore having no lives: having to carry food in their purses because who would have time to eat otherwise? And not just an apple here, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich there — but weird foods. Food that have no business being in purses, like yogurt and pasta. How old are those foods in your purses? Who knows! But isn't it funny? This... FOOD! Food — in a fashion office! Food — inside purses in a fashion office!!! LOLZ!!

    2. "Life has to be accessorized."

    2. "Life has to be accessorized."

    Source: bravotv.com


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    It's sort of Madewell, but not.

    The inspiration for the capsule line is "Japanese Americana."

    The inspiration for the capsule line is "Japanese Americana."

    So said Suno designers Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty. Beatty explains, "We wanted to create something sweet, straight forward and easy."

    Source: glamour.com

    Suno is known for it's beautiful prints and African inspirations.

    Suno is known for it's beautiful prints and African inspirations.

    Source: glamour.com

    The line hits stores and Uniqlo's website May 20.

    The line hits stores and Uniqlo's website May 20.

    Source: glamour.com

    Source: glamour.com


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    With the chase after the Boston bombing suspect captivating the world, what role should those who have nothing to do with it play?


    View Entire List ›


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    Homme Mystere is a line of lingerie — frilly lingerie — for men.

    This is Homme Mystere, a lingerie line for dudes.

    This is Homme Mystere, a lingerie line for dudes.

    It's as simple as it sounds: lingerie — but for men instead of women.

    Think of it as a sweatpants alternative.

    Think of it as a sweatpants alternative.

    Homme Mystere offers things that wouldn't be out of place on Victoria's Secret. Like this thong.

    Homme Mystere offers things that wouldn't be out of place on Victoria's Secret. Like this thong.

    Source: hommemystere.com

    You can't really describe this product better than the company does itself.

    You can't really describe this product better than the company does itself.

    And those measurements refer to WAIST SIZE, so get your mind out of the gutter.


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    The famous fashion editor reveals how she went from toiling in closets to becoming the creative director of Marie Claire .

    In BuzzFeed Fashion's "How I Made It in Fashion" series, insiders reveal how they went from dreaming about fashion to working at the top of the industry. Nina Garcia, the creative director of Marie Claire, discusses her rise from making collages in her childhood bedroom to becoming one of the most famous American fashion personalities of her time.

    There was only one track for me from the very beginning. I was obsessed with fashion when I was young. I thought fashion meant fashion design, and I thought I wanted to be a designer at some point. Later I realized I didn't have the talent to be a designer, but there are so many other things you can do in the industry of fashion; that understanding came after school and after many internships and knowing the industry better.

    I lived in South America when I was growing up. I spent hours sketching. I was good at drawing, and I was obsessed with fashion, but I was also obsessed with magazines. Vanidades — which translates to "vanities" — was one of the few magazines we got. I remember I would kind of cut things out — I would cut out the fashions and I would cut out the jewelry and the shoes and the bags and make collages out of what I liked. So in a way I was kind of putting together my mood boards. But it was not until later that I had that aha moment that I was like, I really want to be in magazines, and that came about from an internship.

    That pivotal aha moment arrived when I was still in school. I was going to FIT and I was doing a lot of internships, and I got an internship at Perry Ellis — it was 1992-93, and it was Marc [Jacobs]'s grunge collection. I was the intern to the assistant to the assistant, and that was a hot internship. I was in the closet packing things up to send to magazines. They would let me out sometimes to greet the editors and ask them, "Do you want a drink?" It was that contact with the editors that made me feel like, wow, I can't believe there is a job like this. The editor that made the biggest impression on me was Carlyne Cerf [De Dudzeele]. (I later ended up working with Carlyne while I was the fashion director at Elle.) I remember she came in for an appointment and I loved her energy, and I was just mesmerized by her. I was like, wow, there is a job where you get to appreciate all these designers and all this incredible talent and you can communicate it through fashion magazines.

    After Perry Ellis, I got an assistant position at Mirabella when Jade Hobson was there, and that really started it all. It was a great place to work — there were a lot of characters, there were a lot of very talented editors there at the time, so it was a great learning experience.

    I came in to assist one of the editors, and then I became a styling assistant. Later I moved to Elle. Again, I started as a fashion assistant and slowly moved into the market, then I became fashion editor in 2000.

    I was so passionate about being in the magazine industry even when I first started at Mirabella. I didn't really care if I was there until midnight, I didn't care if I had to be in the closet unzipping garment bags — for me the wonder of being able to unzip a garment bag and have a Jean Paul Gaultier, a Dior gown come out, that to me was everything. It was pure joy. It didn't really matter what I had to do, I just wanted to be there so badly. I wanted it so badly, it didn't feel like a job. Yes, I was making coffee. Yes, I was making Xerox copies. Yes, I was working in the closet. Yes, I was working on the shoots until midnight. Yes, I was packing and unpacking trunks. But it didn't matter, because all I wanted to do was breathe the same air as the editors. I would do anything to be at a show.

    Mentors are important, absolutely. In this industry it's important that you have somebody who gives you a chance. I had a mentor — Gilles [Bensimon] — who gave me a chance. Gilles believed in me and gave me a chance when he made me fashion director. It was like sink or swim. He didn't hold my hand and walk me through it, but he gave me a chance.

    I didn't ask for the fashion director promotion — I frankly didn't even dream of it — but I was working so hard that I was already doing that job, and he noticed that. He was like, "You know what? Would you want to be a fashion director?" And it was hard, because Gilles was not going to take you by the hand and say, "This is what you do." It was either sink or swim, but he had to believe in me. And I think in this industry, even with the photographers and the designers, somebody's got to give them that opportunity. Somebody's got to believe in them.


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    The Anti-Defamation League's Abraham Foxman expressed support for the designer's new teaching job: “We're friends.”

    Via: Jacques Brinon, file / AP

    The Anti-Defamation League continues its support of disgraced designer John Galliano, who has been hired by top fashion design school Parsons to teach a course on emotion in fashion design.

    Attitudes inside and outside of the fashion community toward post-Dior Galliano, who was fired from the house after footage of his anti-Semitic tirade went viral online, have been mixed. But he at least has a fan in Abraham Foxman, national director of the ADL. "I think it's time that John Galliano be valuated on his skills," Foxman told BuzzFeed Fashion. "I don't know Parsons, I don't know whether he's a good teacher. I'm glad he's working, I'm glad he's continuing on with his life. I don't have an issue, and I think people should stop hounding him on this one unfortunate happening in his life."

    Foxman said that he had spoken to Galliano recently, but declined to divulge what they talked about. "Now that he's going to come here, I look forward to seeing him soon," Foxman said. "We're friends."

    Though some top editors to this day privately express disgust with Galliano's behavior, much of the fashion industry's support for Galliano never wavered, even at the height of his scandal. For these people — Domenico Dolce, Stefano Gabbana, and Alber Elbaz among them — Galliano's talents have always been too great to be overshadowed by a devastatingly public fall from grace. Couple that with the continued support of Jewish leaders, and Galliano seems well on his way to staging the dramatic comeback his biggest fans have been craving since he left Dior two years ago.

    Source: fashion.parsons.edu

    Parsons — which is not a Jewish institution — joins the ADL in noting that Galliano has apologized several times for his unseemly behavior. In a statement, the school hinted that students would have the opportunity to discuss the scandal with him: "We believe that over the past two years Galliano has demonstrated a serious intent to make amends for his past actions, and as part of this workshop, Parsons students will have the opportunity to engage in a frank conversation with Mr. Galliano about the challenges and complications of leading a design house in the 21st century."

    The four-day workshop, called "Show Me Emotion!", is open to BFA seniors "selected based upon pre-submissions reviewed by academic leadership," the school wrote in a letter to students announcing the class. The letter continued:

    A master of tailoring, construction, research, and thematic investigation, John Galliano is an unparalleled living legend capable of blending and blurring the traditional boundaries of practice. A technical genius, after more than twenty-five years of practice, what inspires him most today is not a destination of a geographical sense but the divergent journeys of the soul,mind, and reflection. Feeling, thinking, perceiving, and responding shape his current creative identity and he allows emotion to determine the depth of acollar, the volume between body and sleeve.

    Since being dismissed from Dior, Galliano has been easing his way back into working as a fashion designer. He designed Kate Moss's wedding dress and was subsequently photographed with the model for Vogue. He has also been working in the studio of Oscar de la Renta, his influence evident in the shapes and knotted belts seen on the label's fall 2013 on runway in February.

    Noah Pollak, executive director of the Emergency Committee for Israel, also seemed untroubled by Galliano's burgeoning comeback. "The anti-Semitism the Jewish community tends to be concerned about today is the violent kind and the societal kind: terrorism against Jews and Israel, the anti-Semitism that is sadly so prevalent in Muslim countries and on the radical political left," he wrote in an email. "A one-off rant by an eccentric fashion designer isn't near the top of the list of threats to Jews today."

    Foxman had defended Galliano many times prior to the news of his Parsons gig. Last week he expressed outrage that the Israel Broadcasting Authority would bar Israel's Eurovision contestant from wearing an outfit by Galliano for the broadcast. And in February, he also stood up for Galliano when New York's tabloids made a fuss over photos of the designer walking around the city in a bizarre outfit that looked inspired by traditional Hasidic dress. Foxman told the Daily News at the time it was nothing to freak out over, just "John Galliano being John Galliano."


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    Did you know that everyone wants you to look like Kate Middleton? And that Vera Wang would dress you in black?

    Peplums are less odious if they come in lace.

    Peplums are less odious if they come in lace.

    Well, maybe?

    (Oscar de la Renta.)

    Via: JP Yim / Getty Images

    Just try to dress as close to Kate Middleton on her wedding day as you possibly can.

    Just try to dress as close to Kate Middleton on her wedding day as you possibly can.

    You'll find tons of options! Like this Oscar de la Renta.

    Via: JP Yim / Getty Images

    Or this Oscar de la Renta.

    Via: JP Yim / Getty Images

    Or this Monique Lhuillier number.

    Via: Fernanda Calfat / Getty Images


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    His clothes may be reviled in some fashion circles, but experts argue the brand is simply “in transition” — and Slimane's reign could turn out to be amazing.

    If we're not Courtney Love, we're not supposed to like what's happening to YSL. Or excuse me — Saint Laurent. Since Hedi Slimane took over the label from Stefano Pilati and scrapped the classy if somewhat bland work-friendly clothes of his predecessor, things have been confusing to a lot of fashion people. Two seasons into Hedi's reign, here's what we know about the new SL so far:

    1. Yves is no longer part of the label's name. Now we're supposed to call it "Saint Laurent by Hedi Silmane." What this means is that the label is no longer filed under "Yves Saint Laurent" on Style.com, so if you want to peruse the runway archives, you have to rememeber to go to "Saint Laurent" instead. Could life be worse? Well yes, obviously this isn't a legit "problem," but it seems like it could be confusing from a brand messaging standpoint.

    2. The name thing really gets people hung up. The Twitter handle is still @YSL and the website is still YSL.com. So if you type "SaintLaurent.com" into your browser, it redirects to "YSL.com." What sense does that make? To fashion obsessives, none at all.

    3. The clothes look like average L.A. streetwear. And I type that at the risk of having the label ban me from life from their shows (not that I go anyway, but still! Ban threats are always scary). Anyway, few possesseth the balls to say what they really think of the clothes, but suffice it to say that in private quarters, plenty of people are not happy. (Saint Laurent did not respond to email request for comment for this article, maybe because of this post I did around Paris Fashion Week.) Slimane's first collection was heavy on the floppy hat/caftan/Rachel Zoe feel, which was very vintage YSL. It seemed like he could evolve and do something less derivatively archival in the coming seasons. And then, his second collection seemed like a bizarre homage to Courtney Love/grunge/drunk dressing. And, well, what was that? This isn't Urban Outfitters or Rihanna for River Island — It's Y S L! cried fashion devotees.

    So is the label on a downward spiral to becoming nothing more than an overpriced Forever 21? Like Intermix but all black and more shredded?

    No. The label is not on a slippery downward slope toward only producing clothes that look like they're on drugs. And I'm not defending it like Courtney Love did because I'm going to be in the next ad campaign. (Hahaha. Haha. Ha.) But sometimes, things just look wrong before they look right. (See: Marc Jacobs' Perry Ellis grunge collection.)

    What's happening to the label now is that it's in transition. "YSL" logos may be on the facades of the stores, and the website and Twitter handle may still be "YSL," but do average shoppers care? Probably not. Those of us who work in the fashion industry or spend all day every day looking at fashion on the internet notice, but that is NOT average behavior. One luxury branding expert (who didn't want to go on the record due to the brand's aforementioned ban-happiness) said none of the "YSL"/"SL" inconsistency seemed like a big concern. These image transformations take time, and normal people who aren't in the business don't give a crap about whether or not "Yves" is in the name or "Y"s are lingering in various places.

    The other thing is, YSL isn't even technically "rebranding." "Changing the name, packaging and a new collection does not qualify for rebranding," reads an email from Kaled Hameide, assistant professor of fashion studies at Montclair State University and author of Fashion Branding Unraveled. "What YSL did is best described as an attempt to 'Revamp' or 'Rejuvenate' the brand. Rebranding refers to changing what the brand stands for specifically in the minds of the consumer. It is like changing the DNA." Even the name change itself isn't actually that big of a deal — especially since it pays homage to "Saint Laurent Rive Gauche," the name of Yves Saint Laurent's first ready-to-wear store in Paris, "which is actually a very interesting idea that was never trumpeted enough by the company," Hameide writes.

    Slimane has also brought something invaluable to the brand: buzz. Since he took over, Saint Laurent's runway slideshows have been the second most-viewed and Facebook-liked on Style.com. "It's only with Slimane in the past two seasons that it's made the top 10 list," the site's deputy editor, Matthew Schneier, told me. "I think in some ways you have to trace that to Hedi."

    And Slimane may get flack now for his designs, but some of today's best, most celebrated designers have been positively eviscerated by the press. Just look at Karl Lagerfeld: In 1989, six years after he took over at Chanel, the New Yorker's Holly Burbauch lambasted him for "desecrating the Chanel style with sight gags and overkill, with a tarty sex appeal and crass sensationalism." When Lagerfeld was at Fendi, he used porn stars as models in a 1993 show, which reportedly offended Anna Wintour so much that she walked out of the show. Now look at Lagerfeld: He turns runway models into furries and the critics come away heralding the spectacle and his "outstanding" knitwear.

    Also, just look at Slimane's new ad campaigns with Courtney Love, Kim Gordon, and Daft Punk. They're AWESOME, and they fit perfectly into the edgy, black-and-white, rock 'n' roll image Slimane is crafting for the brand.

    Ultimately, the sales will have to be there for this brand rejuvenation to work. The New York Times made it sound like they were doing pretty well so far. Saint Laurent certainly has the name recognition — and now the buzz — to keep those going strong.

    Besides, can't you just see American Apparel knocking this sparkly body stocking off?

    Saint Laurent, fall 2013.

    Via: Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images


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    Don't believe what they say — clothes are NOT ALWAYS ON YOUR SIDE.

    You will lose every pair of sunglasses you spend more than $20 on.

    You will lose every pair of sunglasses you spend more than $20 on.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    Your tights will run the first time you wear them.

    Your tights will run the first time you wear them.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    You will want to return things you bought at Forever 21 but you CAN'T.

    You will want to return things you bought at Forever 21 but you CAN'T.

    Because they only give store credit. Assholes.

    Source: Tumblr.com


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    So goes the plot of a truly amazing-sounding book.

    Not What She Bargained For: Extreme Couponer Suspected in Retail Manager's Murder
    Women's fiction author Linda Joffe Hull pens comical tale of penny-pinching gone wrong

    ST. PAUL, MINN. — Extreme couponing has been trending in America the past few years, and now these loyal penny-pinchers can enjoy the misadventures of coupon queen Mrs. Frugalicious in the new novel, Eternally 21, by Linda Joffe Hull. Eternally 21 is scheduled for release June 8.

    With the looming risk of her husband's secret—that the financial guru lost the family's nest egg in a Ponzi scheme—being exposed, and the possibility of bankruptcy and foreclosure, Maddie Michaels is willing to do anything to keep the family afloat. To maintain the appearance that everything is financially fine, Maddie sets up a bargain hunter's website under the alias Mrs. Frugalicious.

    While at the mall researching deals for her site, Maddie is mistakenly accused of shoplifting at Eternally 21 by manager Laila DeSimone. Shortly after the accusation and Maddie's acquittal, the universally disliked manager drops dead at the store. Since Laila was a universally disliked manager, the police now have a murder suspect list longer than Maddie's bargain spreadsheet. But Maddie discovers the bulk of the evidence points to her. Now, Maddie's in a race to find the real killer before the police pin the crime on her.

    "A character whom readers will be pleased to follow" —PUBLISHERS WEEKLY
    "Never has coupon clipping been so fun or harrowing. Fast-paced, entertaining and filled with twist and turns, Eternally 21 will save mystery readers money and make them lose sleep as they cheer for formerly wealthy turned frugally funny Maddie Michaels."
    —JOELLE CHARBONNEAU, AUTHOR OF THE REBECCA ROBBINS AND GLEE CLUB MYSTERIES

    "Maggie's coupon-clipping tips are seamlessly incorporated into the well-constructed mystery, which provides a series of stunning twists that will leave the reader eager to see what will happen to maddie in the next installment." —BOOKLIST

    Via: Shutterstock


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    Executives are focused on adding “greater fashion credibility and relevance to the brand.” If J. Crew can do it, why can't they?

    Coach is more than pink foil accents and hearty leather goods that are the lust object of every American teenager. The brand is focused on building up its fashion credibility, executives said in the an earnings call with investors Tuesday. Citing success with its recent emphasis on fashionable footwear, men's stuff, and expansion throughout Asia, it sounds like the brand's next phase will involve working on getting a little hipper. It makes sense to figure out how to do that now before president and executive creative director Reed Krakoff, who will not renew his contract when it expires in June of 2014, leaves to work on his own editor-adored, super-fancy namesake line.

    After rattling off a few new high-up hires who will work on women's design and store concepts, Coach President and Chief Commercial Officer Victor Luis hinted at Coach staging a fashion show of some kind:

    The creative team now in place is focused on developing and presenting a full head to toe expression of the Coach woman and man, including a focused ready to wear presentation to inspire our customers with a complete Coach point of view that is relevant to how she lives her life. Over the next few quarters, the level of innovation across product categories will increase as we continue to add emotion to our offering and greater fashion credibility and relevance to the brand.

    A Coach representative woud neither confirm nor deny that a Coach fashion week show would occur. But if J. Crew can sashay its little khakis and sequined cardigans to the Lincoln Center tents, and stage a show that's considerably buzzier than Charlotte Ronson's (in her sister's post-LiLo phase, though, which means no LiLo cameos), Coach can absolutely do the same. Buzz isn't that hard to come by, after all — just leave some people off the list and let FOMO do its work.

    Chic-ing things up will be key for other Coach ventures, like the brand's desire to capture a greater share of the European luxury goods market. Luis continued:

    As you know, Europe is a large market for women's and men's luxury accessories, representing about 25% of the global category sales. Coach's heritage, linked to New York fashion, is appealing for many Europeans, and creates a differentiated positioning compared to the traditional luxury brands. In addition, we believe the region has significant long term potential, attracting both domestic shoppers and the international tourists.

    So far it sounds like Coach is on track. Its men's business is exploding, according to North American Group President Michael Tucci, who expects to grow men's by 50% this year. Coach is "experiencing success in men's across all concepts and store types, and across all geographies and channels," he added. And what could be more European/fashion-y/fashion week-y than a fancy clothes-buying man?

    Via: Carlo Allegri / Reuters


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    South Korea has the highest rate of plastic surgery per capita of anywhere in the world. A beauty pageant in the region would have gone unnoticed had the remarkably similar faces of the contestants also gone unnoticed.

    For a complete comparison, Reddit users made this:

    For a complete comparison, Reddit users made this:

    And, naturally, a GIF.

    And, naturally, a GIF.

    Here are their individual cards.

    Here are their individual cards.

    Which appeared on a Japanese blog. Photoshop surely also has something to do with their remarkably similar faces.

    Source: blog.livedoor.jp

    Source: blog.livedoor.jp


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  • 04/25/13--14:56: 9 Ways Rachel Zoe Leans In
  • As if she's going to let Rodger dress Skyler in Grateful Dead tees and sweatpants at 20 months old. AS. IF.

    Source: bravotv.com

    I know this is not the way to sell a recap full of text on BuzzFeed, but what was last night's episode of the Rachel Zoe Project? No, seriously — the entire plot was about Rachel getting her picture taken in a gold lamé dress, trying on turbans and coats in her closet, and then doing her look book shoot for pre-fall. Pre-fall isn't even a real season. It's a PRE season. It's the APPETIZER to fashion week. The AMUSE FUCKING BOUCHE if I were to be really negative about it (heeeyyy Rebecca Martinson). Anyway, the whole thing could have been done in about ten minutes because everything was so unbelievably unnecessarily drawn out. Also, there were like eight lengthy flashbacks this episode, none of which needed to take eight minutes.

    ANYWAY. There were enough absurd moments to cobble together a list of ways Rachel Zoe leans in, so here you go. Hopefully this episode was the amuse-bouche to a full-fat tasting menu of juicy drama.

    1. Rachel influences everyone around her, but mostly her husband.

    1. Rachel influences everyone around her, but mostly her husband.

    Source: bravotv.com

    In the very beginning of the episode Rodger is wearing a Missoni scarf. Now, we already know that she and Mandana say "oh my God" in the exact same eerily annoying way. And this episode, we learn that Rodger, who is a man, not only says the same things Rachel has taught Mandana to say all the time, but that he also wears her accessories. Finally I understand why the man wears so much jewelry all the time. It's because he is Rachel Zoe, whose nickname is "accessory Sue." Rachel Zoe's "Lean In Circle" is not a circle so much as a cult where everyone becomes a lesser version of their gold lamé Queen.


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