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BuzzFeed, Find Your New Favorite Thing

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    Also: “whale” or “big Kim.” The internet/world is so rude.

    This graph shows how frequently Kim Kardashian has been called fat in a headline.

    This graph shows how frequently Kim Kardashian has been called fat in a headline.

    BuzzFeed's data team analyzed articles published to our more than 2,000 partner sites to see if Kim Kardashian is indeed being called "fat" more often now that she's pregnant. The results? She most definitely is.

    The above graph shows how often Kim's name appeared in a headline with the word "fat" or "whale" or the phrase "weight gain." The data team also looked for the phrase "big Kim" in headlines. In the four months prior to announcing her pregnancy, which Kanye did at New Year's, her name appeared in headlines with those terms 100 times. In the first four months of her pregnancy, her name appeared with those terms 137 times — or 37 percent more often than pre-pregnant Kim.

    So, what does this mean? That the media is mean. But amazingly, they finally gave everyone a reason to defend Kim Kardashian. So maybe this will actually work out well for her. You know she has a Weight Watchers endorsement deal coming anyway.

    Via: Jason Merritt / Getty Images


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    The man behind street-style blog Street Peeper was never obsessed with fashion or photography before launching his blog. Yet he's rapidly becoming one of the most influential photographers in the business.

    Phil Oh, keepin' it real.

    Via: Courtesy of Phil Oh

    In this series, BuzzFeed Fashion speaks to the industry's most influential players about how they made it in fashion. Below, Street Peeper's Phil Oh, one of the internet's first street-style photographers, shares how he went from photographing famous editors with a basic point-and-shoot camera to shooting for Saks Fifth Avenue.

    I never was that interested in fashion growing up. I grew up in Chicago and moved to New York in '98 to go to NYU. I graduated December '01 right after 9/11. I spent about a year and a half after school backpacking around the world on $10 a day — I had studied history, so I wanted to see some of the places I had studied. The job market wasn't great, so I was waiting tables or bartending or running parties; I worked at an internet start-up for about a year. And I lived in a model dorm for like six months as a chaperone; I got free rent. Looking back on it, it was funny, but it was miserable. It was like this endless parade of 18-year-old Russian girls, and all the club promoters would come pick them up and take them to Marquee [the nightclub]. I wrote a book about it with one of the models I lived with, since I figured people would rather read a book cowritten by a model than just by me, and I used the money from that to start Street Peeper.

    I never really read fashion magazines. I remember the first time I saw street-style anything was in the Fruits book. Fruits is a really long-running Tokyo street-style magazine that covers Harajuku street style, and it released its first book [in 2001]. But I had no interest or background in fashion, no interest or background in photography. I just thought street-style blogging would be fun and sort of an excuse to travel to London, Paris, or Tokyo. I saw The Sartorialist and Facehunter had just started. What was funny was when I started my blog, I was like, Oh my god, there are already two street-style blogs — will people think it's corny or tacky that I'm starting a third one? Will people think I'm unoriginal? That's why I tried to add something else with the brand search or style search — you can type in "high-waisted" or "Prada" to search the images.

    Via: http://www.amazon.com/Fruits-Shoichi-Aoki/dp/B000ILZ66E

    I was doing actual on-the-street street style — people on the street not at fashion week. I spent around 10 hours a week on the blog. I'd spend a weekend, maybe like a Sunday afternoon or one or two weekday afternoons, in Soho or the Lower East Side or Williamsburg. I started with a dinky point-and-shoot [camera]. I didn't care so much about composition or if the images were sharp. I felt like the actual quality of the photography didn't really matter, and that it was much more about the subject and trying to make a pretty image.

    I started going to fashion week because I figured I could get a lot of pictures at one time, and it's an excuse to party. But as street style got more popular and advertisers would come try to advertise on my blog, and here and there magazines would start buying my pictures, I thought, Oh shit, this could be something more than just a stupid hobby.

    As more and more photographers started showing up to take pictures, I realized I had to upgrade my camera. It's a little embarrassing going up to important editors in Paris and being like, "Can I take your picture?" using this shitty camera. So I started slowly upgrading my camera over the years and slowly figuring out how to use it. I never took a class or anything. It's a lot of trial and error and a lot of practice. Now there are so many photographers at the shows, which I complain about all the time, but one consequence of it is it's made me push myself to work harder and really care about getting an interesting picture.


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    Even if he isn't getting paid, and even if it's just for three days.

    Galliano in New York in February.

    Via: Splash News

    The New School's Jewish Students Union has expressed disappointment in administrators' decision to hire John Galliano to teach a class about emotion and fashion design at its fashion school, Parsons. Their sentiments are a reminder that while the fashion industry is eager to see Galliano's career recover rapidly and substantially, the extreme offense prompted by his two-year-old remarks — including the statement "I love Hitler" — might never fully vanish.

    "The heart of the issue is Jewish students on campus do not feel comfortable with him being on campus teaching a class, even if he's unpaid," said the New School's Jewish Student Union president Jennifer Kaplan, a junior studying history and Judaism at the Eugene Lang College of liberal arts. A week ago, the school announced that the ex-Christian Dior designer, who was fired in 2011 after video footage of his anti-semitic rant went viral online, would teach a three-day workshop at Parsons to eligible senior students.

    The Jewish Students Union has launched a petition on Change.org, which asks, "This is a person who was fired from Dior for his anti-semitic remarks, who Natalie Portman refused to work with because of his remarks, so why is Parsons The New School for Design hiring him?" The petition was created before the students knew Galliano would be working unpaid (that information was announced Friday), though Kaplan says that information doesn't change the JSU's stance on the issue. The petition continues:

    Parsons The New School for Design plans to hire John Galliano for a 3-day workshop. It doesn't matter if its for three months or three days, hiring someone who has made such horrific comments shows that the school values Galliano over their entire Jewish student body. It shows they value him over their students' respect, peace of mind, and heritage.

    It is disgraceful to hire someone who has made such inhumane comments.

    There should be no room for this kind of person as a staff member on the faculty at Parsons. Imagine if the school were hiring a person who publicly voiced support for the KKK — there would likely be backlash because it's not right to have someone like that teaching at a school. But because this is someone who has made anti-Semitic remarks, people are willing to look the other way. This is unnaceptable [sic].


    Kaplan said that the JSU's "active members all communicated, and we're just extremely uncomfortable with his hiring." She added that about 300 students subscribe to the group's email list, and that while they don't hold formal meetings, 30 to 50 students usually attend regular JSU gatherings, like Shabbat dinners. None of the active members study fashion design, according to Kaplan.

    Kaplan said she's heard some criticism of her stance since she's not a Parsons student. "There's such a small amount of fashion students, and they don't have time to be part of a student association, they're so busy," she said. But she emphasized that as the president of the JSU, it's her responsibility to represent Jewish students across the whole campus.

    The Anti-Defamation League has repeatedly voiced support for Galliano. Just last week, the ADL's national director Abraham Foxman told BuzzFeed Fashion, "I'm glad he's continuing on with his life. I don't have an issue, and I think people should stop hounding him on this one unfortunate happening in his life."

    Despite this stance from Foxman, who also told BuzzFeed that he's now "friends" with Galliano, Kaplan said the JSU couldn't be sure that the designer's apologies were genuine. "After [his] statements, can someone no longer be an anti-semite?" she wondered. "His statements were atrocious."

    In response, Foxman provided this email statement to BuzzFeed Fashion Monday, further explaining why the ADL has been supportive of Galliano's recovery:

    "John Galliano has met with ADL on numerous occasions. He has expressed remorse for his actions made a clear and unequivocal apology for his words. He has met with rabbis and Holocaust scholars and has gone on an intellectual and moral pilgrimage to learn from his past mistakes. He has also offered to do volunteer work with fashion schools in Israel. From every interaction we have had with him, it is clear that Mr. Galliano has made a very positive effort to redeem himself, and it is because of this effort that I am willing to stand up for him and to say, 'let's give him a second chance.'"

    The New School would not comment on the JSU's petition, instead providing the same statement emailed to press last week, which read, "We believe that over the past two years Galliano has demonstrated a serious intent to make amends for his past actions, and as part of this workshop, Parsons students will have the opportunity to engage in a frank conversation with Mr. Galliano about the challenges and complications of leading a design house in the 21st century."

    Kaplan said that JSU officers emailed New School dean Joel Towers Tuesday night, and he responded "extremely quickly." Kaplan didn't want to go into detail about what the email said, but revealed that Towers, who is Jewish, described his personal connection to the Holocaust. "It was a fantastic email," Kaplan said. "It didn't say everything we wanted, but it was very personalized." Other administrators send officers less personalized responses.

    Ultimately the JSU's goal is to stop Galliano from teaching on campus. The organization is not sure what actions it will take if administrators don't stop the class (a protest wasn't ruled out). But Kaplan suggested Galliano just might be able to do something — though it's unclear what that would be — to make the JSU feel comfortable with his teaching appointment. "If he reached out and said, hey, I want to do this, we'd have to discuss it with the club and see how people feel about that," Kaplan said.


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  • 04/30/13--09:52: The Best Of Sh*t Models Say
  • “How to get scouted: Make sure you are young. Like, 12-16 young.”

    Source: shitamodelsays.tumblr.com

    Source: shitamodelsays.tumblr.com


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    It's just like exercising — but without doing any exercise at all.

    You are surely asking yourself, why, what on earth are these people doing?

    You are surely asking yourself, why, what on earth are these people doing?

    Source: gifsforum.com

    It's yoga — of the face! So instead of working out your body the way you do in most yoga classes, you work out your face. Because when it's all over you're supposed to look like you've just gotten a face lift. Just like how your butt looks like it's two inches higher on your body after you do two dozen lunges. (Ha ha no.)

    BuzzFeed Fashion was unable to independently confirm whether or not most of the people doing facial yoga "need" face lifts. However, VFiles bravely went INSIDE the bizarre fitness fad to film fashion model Xiao Wen Ju's facial yoga routine. It should be noted that the adorable model is 20 but can easily pass for at least six years younger than that. Is that because of facial yoga? Who can say! But if you want to get in on the craze that could very well knock zumba on its ass, know that it apparently involves an instructor, sun salutations, and savasana, just like regular yoga. The only real difference is that all the things that suck about regular yoga get replaced with facial acrobatics that don't look so bad at all.

    This is how it works.

    First, make your face look like it's melting.

    First, make your face look like it's melting.

    Source: gifsforum.com

    Then pretend to chew with your mouth open.

    Then pretend to chew with your mouth open.

    Source: gifsforum.com


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    The death toll has passed 400, but hundreds more remain unaccounted for as cleanup and protests rage on in Dhaka. WARNING: Graphic images ahead.

    On Wednesday, garment workers in Bangladesh united to protest last week's horrific factory collapse. Protestors are demanding the death penalty for Sohel Rana, the owner of Rana Plaza, which housed five factories.

    On Wednesday, garment workers in Bangladesh united to protest last week's horrific factory collapse. Protestors are demanding the death penalty for Sohel Rana, the owner of Rana Plaza, which housed five factories.

    Via: Andrew Biraj / Reuters

    Here's Sohel Rana headed to a hearing on Tuesday in Dhaka wearing handcuffs and police riot gear.

    Here's Sohel Rana headed to a hearing on Tuesday in Dhaka wearing handcuffs and police riot gear.

    Bangladeshi media say Rana was involved in illegal activity relating to guns and drugs. The New York Times reports that "it appears that the tragedy could have been averted if the frantic warnings of an engineer who examined the building the day before had been heeded." Many of the workers at Rana Plaza made as little as $40 a month.

    Via: Bangladesh / Reuters

    As of Wednesday, the death toll had reached 410 and continues to rise.

    As of Wednesday, the death toll had reached 410 and continues to rise.

    Hundreds more bodies are thought to be trapped in the rubble. Unidentified victims were buried in a mass grave Wednesday.

    Via: Andrew Biraj / Reuters


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    Baby + crown + corgi puppy. What else is there in life?

    Oh and naturally, the royal baby will be wearing silk ruffled bloomers instead of Pampers.

    Oh and naturally, the royal baby will be wearing silk ruffled bloomers instead of Pampers.

    Source: thedailybeast.com


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    The designer won't produce a fall collection. It's hard to be successful if you stray from your vision.

    Ovitz at her fall show in New York.

    Via: Mark Von Holden / Getty Images

    Kimberly Ovitz will not produce the fall 2013 collection she showed at New York Fashion Week. If her guests, including notable front-row presence Anna Wintour, and the nice reviews of the collection indicated anything, it seemed to be that Ovitz's line was on the up-and-up. But the reality of most fashion lines is that they fail. And Ovitz's is shaping up to be the latest casualty of a brutal industry.

    Ovitz would not explain why she's closing her line for the next couple of seasons or why she's not producing the fall line. But designers don't produce things when they don't have enough orders for the clothes and therefore can't afford to make them. (The Rachel Zoe Project viewers will recall the scene where Rachel finds out she can't produce the long white sequin maxi dress she loves so much because buyers rejected it.) A lack of orders could very well have something to do with Ovitz's collapse. However, sources indicate to BuzzFeed Fashion that her biggest problems run deeper than that.

    Ovitz's line is known for minimalist body-con dresses and asymmetrical draping. It's like Helmut Lang redux, basically. That's good in a way because her clothes are generally cute and wearable — the kind of thing you go for if you want to look cool or just juice-fasted and are dying to show off your flat stomach. (For the record: BuzzFeed Fashion does not condone juice fasts.) But why should customers go for her things over Helmut Lang, a great line that's been around for ages and has a lower-priced line (HELMUT Helmut Lang) that is actually more competitively priced than Ovitz's stuff?

    When Ovitz started, she thought she'd compete with a designer more along the lines of Ralph Lauren than Helmut Lang. But she allowed people to push her in a direction that ultimately wasn't true to who she was. And now sources suggest that she's feeling a bit directionless. Throughout her several years in business, she's failed to become known for a specific thing. Ralph Lauren is known for the tie, Diane Von Furstenberg is known for the wrap dress, Alexander Wang — a young designer who's had a phenomenal rise after just several years in business — is known for the hoodie.

    Ovitz might be able to refine her aesthetic by taking time off. But it's hard to make a comeback if you've never really made a splash to begin with.

    In the meantime, Ovitz's clothes are on clearance on her website. Enter the code SS13SP for 75% off.

    A look from Ovitz's fall line. Though you won't be able to buy it, maybe DIY it with some duct tape?

    Via: Mark Von Holden / Getty Images


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    Is shopping “the new terrorism”?

    The collapsed Rana Plaza in Bangladesh.

    Via: Bangladesh / Reuters

    If you're an average consumer, there's a good chance you shop at affordable places like H&M, Forever 21, Zara, or JCPenney. These stores fuel and fulfill our demand for fast fashion — trendy, cheap things we can easily discard as soon as the clothes fall apart or the next covetable fad comes along. But they also fuel an unsustainable demand for dirt cheap labor available in the extremely poor nations like Bangladesh, where the death toll from the collapsed Rana Plaza factory has passed 400 and is expected to climb by hundreds more.

    "Virtually every major brand that we shop at is producing in Bangladesh," said Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Price of Cheap Fashion. "I would say the problems at Rana Plaza are not specific to that building, and they're not just specific to the brands operating in that building" — they're pervasive in the whole country, where labor goes for 14 cents an hour.

    Clothing manufacturing conditions in Bangladesh are typically terrible across the board. The infrastructure is awful (an engineer saw cracks in Rana Plaza's facade the day before the collapse, but nothing was done about it), the workers sometimes don't even receive their wages, and local authorities don't enforce building codes. Yet with the demand for fast fashion an all-time high, more and more clothes are being made in the kinds of conditions that morally offend a lot of people in the Western world — and without these kinds of well-publicized tragedies, shoppers don't even think about it.

    "The reason we have fast fashion is the cheap exploited labor around the world," said Cline. She estimates that "less than 10% of what we're wearing... was made in factories where people were paid a living wage and working in safe and legal conditions."

    Sustainable fashion writer and consultant Amy DuFault has come to think of shopping as a form of terrorism. "It's just something to think about," she said, "This idea of shopping as the new sort of terrorism. And it sounds dramatic, but if you think about it it's actually really true — we have control over what's happening in the environment, the people and planet."

    A host of complicated factors have contributed to this disturbing, massive exploitation of the world's cheapest labor. First, labor costs in China, where infrastructure and technology are not necessarily great but still better than what you find in countries like Bangladesh or Pakistan, have increased. So stores wanting to deliver fast fashion to consumers at competitive prices are moving on to cheaper labor in Bangladesh. Also, in 2005 the U.S. government lifted quotas on imports, allowing U.S. companies to import as many clothes from impoverished nations as they wish, which experts believe really helped fuel the explosion of fast fashion.

    Another big problem with the manufacturing process is the use of subcontractors, which are extremely hard to supervise. Large companies that make things in different places all over the world hire subcontractors to find them factories to manufacture things. Those factories might subcontract to other factories, which makes it really hard for even companies that have reputable monitoring agencies to keep track of everything going on in the supply chain.

    Ultimately, it's the companies' jobs to ensure their goods are ethically produced, however, "The companies are not filled with bad guys rubbing their hands together saying, who cares if we lose a couple hundred workers?" noted Susan Scafidi, a professor of fashion law at Fordham.

    "Focusing more on infrastructure is something these companies need to do, but even the most well-meaning companies are going to have a tough time. They really have to rely on third-person monitoring if they're a small company," continued Scafidi. "It is truly a headache for the industry right now."

    So, how can you tell if you're getting something that's ethically made? An easy but imperfect way is to look at the label. Scafidi called Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Honduras "the worst of the worst." Garments from China are likely to be made by workers in better conditions than you find in a place like Bangladesh. "There is no safe Bangladeshi label right now," Scafidi warned.

    Concerned shoppers should also look for clothes bearing a Made in the U.S.A. label. American Apparel (which has its own problems, but exploiting cheap labor in Bangladesh is not one of them) makes everything here.

    Other labels focused on ethically manufactured clothes but that don't produce everything in the U.S. include Everlane and Eileen Fisher, the latter of which Cline admires for its transparency about their manufacturing process — something most stores lack in spades. Eileen Fisher admits that not all of their manufacturing is perfect (some things are made in China, where factory conditions have improved drastically in the last decade) but they carry a lot of explicitly labeled fair trade and organic items. You can find a sizable list of other ethically minded brands on Cline's website.

    But ultimately, the industry won't be more transparent about its manufacturing processes as a whole unless consumers demand it. "Every interview I've done in the past few days, people are asking where can we shop instead. I think this is a real turning point," Cline said. Besides, there's nowhere else for companies to go for cheaper labor right now — Bangladesh was the last stop for rock bottom prices.

    Scafidi and Cline believe consumers would pay a little bit more to shop somewhere with ethical manufacturing standards. After all, what would mean more to you as a consumer? Having one more super-cheap shirt, or waiting a little longer to buy a shirt but having the peace of mind knowing that shirt was made by workers treated not just humanely, but fairly?

    Of course realistically, it's hard for consumers to remember these tragedies every time they shop. Shopping is an emotional and often impulsive experience for most of us — we're looking for a cheap pick-me-up after a bad day, or a dress to impress a date. "There will never be any visual cue in the store to say, hey think about [how clothes are made]. It's an atmosphere designed to make you not think about where the things came from, but to think about how much fun the clothes will be," Scafidi said.

    Apparel companies have a lot of power, though. They've certainly proved they can change the way we think about shopping. "They've fed us fast fashion, they've fed us cheap and chic, and constantly changing [merchandise], and they've benefitted a lot from that. So they have to be partners with the American consumer in changing our shopping habits," Scafidi said. "You have to bring your conscience with you into a store. It's worth dragging along because in the longer term it's better for everybody."

    A family member of a victim of the Rana Plaza collapse tries to identify her sister-in-law's remains.

    Via: Ismail Ferdous / AP


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  • 05/03/13--10:40: Sides Are The New Cleavage
  • Unless you're Ashley Tisdale, in which case you're in favor of showing side and boob.

    The sideless army: Kate Moss, Gwyneth Paltrow, Erin Wasson, Gwen Stefani, and Ashley Tisdale.

    The dress that drew so much traffic it practically broke tabloid news sites across the world last week? That appeared on Tracy Anderson's biggest DVD seller of all time, the body of Gwyneth Paltrow, which went to the Iron Man 3 premiere in a dress by Antonio Berardi that was essentially a see-through bathrobe with modesty panels down the front and back. It was the rare kind of red carpet gown a celeb probably has to bikini wax to wear. Though extreme, the look was actually an example of a flattering, rising trend: sidelessness. If the best-dressed people on red carpets are telling women anything these days, it's put away your cleavage and bust out your sides. (Ashley Tisdale would argue for both, as you can see, but I did specify "best dressed.)

    Over the past year, year and half, sideless gowns — and jumpsuits, if you're Gwen Stefani — have been among the most discussed of all red carpet looks. Even the sparkly nipple sculptures Beyoncé's wearing on tour can't out-OMG a good sideless dress or onesie. But unlike Beyonce's sculpted breasts, which can be nothing but sculpted breasts and therefore not illusive at all, a lot of sideless dresses are merely illusions. Put some nude fabric under a sheer panel and there you go — Erin Wasson and Kate Moss look naked, get headlines, you think you've seen them sort of naked, and everybody wins.

    And if you're just a regular person looking for a fun look to wear out at night, why not show your sides instead of your, say, cleavage? Cleavage isn't necessarily slenderizing, but the beauty of the sideless dress is it creates an illusion of a slimmer shape, just like Stella McCartney's "miracle dress" does. And judging by Gwyneth Paltrow (who seems to prefer to go slip-free and commando with her sideless gowns, but you don't have to) — who is a meter of fashion trends and Tracy Anderson's method if there ever was one — side-free is the way to be.


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    These terms have migrated from the pages of women's magazines to the twitter feeds of the fashion industry's elite. If we never used them again, probably no one would miss them.

    Source: online-image-editor.com

    Source: online-image-editor.com

    Source: online-image-editor.com

    Source: online-image-editor.com


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    Hai, PRADA!

    This is how Kanye West and Kim Kardashian dressed for dinner at Anna Wintour's house the night before the Met Ball.

    This is how Kanye West and Kim Kardashian dressed for dinner at Anna Wintour's house the night before the Met Ball.

    Kanye was elegantly yet edgily attired his usual leather jeggings, a plush black top, hippie shoe fringe, and an expression as though he'd forgotten who he is. And Kim, who is dying to be in Vogue but hasn't, presumably because she's not the classy type of celeb the editors prefer to feature, wore a skintight black Prada dress and white heels. Prada is one of Anna's favorite labels, so the move was surely calculated.

    Kanye, sources have said, is desperate to get Kim in Vogue, but the only way he might be able to do it is by giving them the first exclusive photos of their spawn.

    Via: Jackson Lee /Splash News

    The two are rumored to be attending Monday night's Met Ball together.

    The two are rumored to be attending Monday night's Met Ball together.

    It's only the fanciest, classiest, best, most fashionable red carpet event of the year. Wintour reportedly banned Kim from last year's Met Ball so it would be a "big deal" (not really, but in the small, gossip-y world of fashion, a HUGE story, no pun intended) if she went. The fact that she was allowed in Wintour's home for an "intimate dinner," according to Us Weekly, suggests she'll be allowed onto Wintour's red carpet.

    Via: 247PapsTV / Splash News

    Wintour loves her Prada coats bearing the same flower motif as Kim's dress.

    Wintour loves her Prada coats bearing the same flower motif as Kim's dress.

    She wears them to fashion week and film premieres regularly. For the record, this was her Thing before it was Kim's Thing.

    Via: Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

    However, she's known to be anti-black.

    However, she's known to be anti-black.

    So it's hard to imagine how much side-eye she gave Kim for showing up in that Prada dress. She might have been like, "ghastly, black again!" Or, "ghastly, I wear that collection!" Or, "thank God, it's not Sears! We can be friends!"

    We'll probably never know.

    Via: Felix Kunze / Getty Images


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    Despite having no formal design training, the Alice + Olivia designer created one of the most successful American labels to emerge in the last decade.

    Bendet's fall 2013 Alice + Olivia presentation at New York Fashion Week in February.

    Via: Jennifer Graylock / Getty Images

    BuzzFeed Fashion's "How I Made It in Fashion" series takes you behind the success of the industry's most important players. Here, Alice + Olivia founder and designer Stacey Bendet shares her story.

    I don't have a traditional design background, but it's inherent to me. My father was in the fabric industry, and even my grandfather and my great-grandfather were lace manufacturers. Ever since I was a little girl, I loved to make things. I always made dresses for my Barbie dolls. When I was 13, I designed my Bat Mitzvah dress. I sketched it and I went to the patternmaker and everything — it was beaded lace, and it was this little shift with a little matching jacket. I think the dress is so beautiful today. You take those pictures when you're 14 or 16 or whatever and you're like, What was I thinking? And I look back at that dress and I think it was cute and elegant.

    When I was in college at the University of Pennsylvania, where I studied international relations and French, I studied abroad in Paris for a semester. I think when you're there, you can't help but be immersed in fashion because it's such a part of the city. At that time, I just realized I wanted to do something in fashion — I didn't know I wanted to design.

    I had to support myself when I graduated, so I guess somewhere around my senior year I taught myself how to build websites. I started building flash websites for people, friends at first. I did the site for a friend's PR firm; I built [New York society photographer] Patrick McMullan's first site. I built sites for this one company that was starting a few different clothing lines and I was in their offices for a couple of months. I was learning about design, so I saw that's the patternmaker and this is that. And when I was there I decided to make some pants and see what happens. I had taken sewing classes, so I knew the basics. They were striped — this wide waistband two-button style with a flared leg, and they were super sexy and bold. (Now bold fabrics and colors are really inherent to the line.) But they became the signature pants in the Alice + Olivia collection.

    I don't think there was anything like those pants at the time. Everyone was wearing jeans then — it was when Seven for All Mankind and Earl and all those denim lines had just become really popular and everyone had 100 pairs of jeans, and I was like, I want some pants! In the cut of a jean, but pants. And that was how we started.


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    Giant headpiece, floral dress, velvet plaid thigh-high boots — and enough jewelry on her hands to knock you out cold.

    Sarah Jessica Parker had one of the craziest, best, loudest, mismatched (in a good way, I think) looks on the Met red carpet.

    Sarah Jessica Parker had one of the craziest, best, loudest, mismatched (in a good way, I think) looks on the Met red carpet.

    She was the only person wearing velvet plaid thigh-high boots, and more power to her.

    Via: Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty Images

    This amazing Philip Treacy headpiece was one of the best things on the carpet all night.

    This amazing Philip Treacy headpiece was one of the best things on the carpet all night.

    Not visible here are SJP's approximately one million rings, which made her look like she had diamond robot hands.

    Via: Getty Images

    She told reporters she had a pediatrician appointment at 8:30 the next morning.

    She told reporters she had a pediatrician appointment at 8:30 the next morning.

    If that's not in keeping with the nights PUNK theme, I just don't know what is.

    Via: Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty Images


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    Her Met Ball red carpet look. And here you thought hair chalk was over.

    Known badass Marissa Mayer kept a relatively low profile on the Met Gala red carpet — except for her hair.

    Known badass Marissa Mayer kept a relatively low profile on the Met Gala red carpet — except for her hair.

    Just as hair chalk seemed to be on the way out, every person you would never expect to streak their hair went and streaked their hair in honor of the night's punk theme. The Yahoo CEO rocked it better than most people there.

    Via: @HuffPostStyle


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    Punk ran the gamut from Madonna wearing no pants and a gym locker around her neck to… Anna Wintour sashaying in a pretty floral gown.

    Madonna arrived only after Beyoncé — and shook her partially exposed ass for the photographers.

    Madonna arrived only after Beyoncé — and shook her partially exposed ass for the photographers.

    She is the only person on the planet (except for maybe Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama) who can rightfully arrive after Beyoncé and not have everyone waiting there for hours hate her for it or find her presumptuous. When Beyoncé entered the carpet, it was like a moment of zen — everyone fell silent as she petered about, turning daintily to and fro like a ballerina in a music box. But when Madonna came on — perhaps because she is a true punk and Beyonce is not — all the photographers started yelling. "MADONAAAA!!! FASHION!!! RAAAAA!!!" I'm not kidding: "MADONNA!!! GIVE FASHION!! WEEERRRKKK!!!" And so every so often she'd turn around and wiggle her butt a little bit, which only made them yell louder because that wasn't actually what they wanted to photograph. Because they are crazy. Or, maybe, just punk.

    Via: Carlo Allegri / Reuters

    She attended with her twentysomething dancer boyfriend (right), who wore a Givenchy kilt and leopard man blouse and told reporters he hoped for peace in the Middle East.

    Via: Carlo Allegri / Reuters

    Beyoncé made J. Lo and Kate Upton look like big fat nobodies.

    Beyoncé made J. Lo and Kate Upton look like big fat nobodies.

    There was Beyoncé at the bottom of the carpet, hair and cleavage aloft, boots and train aflame in orange. And somewhere up the steps J. Lo, wearing what was essentially a sheer body stocking, was talking to cameras, and Kate Upton was reminding a reporter that yeah, she was at this event last year. And no one cared that they were there or wearing clothes or hot or anything.

    Via: Carlo Allegri / Reuters

    Beyoncé said her corset was so tight she wanted to cut the lacing in the back with scissors.

    Beyoncé said her corset was so tight she wanted to cut the lacing in the back with scissors.

    Look, everyone has to start somewhere if they want to one day be punk badasses. (And Beyoncé is many, many things — but not a punk badass.)

    Via: The Associated Press / AP


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    The consensus seems to be that it looks more Raymour & Flanigan than runway couture.

    Most people seemed to think Kim's very floral dress made her look like a couch.

    Most people seemed to think Kim's very floral dress made her look like a couch.

    Via: @zekNcashe

    Via: Tumblr.com


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    The punk-themed “Oscars of the East Coast” finally allowed celebrities to do the thing they just really never have the opportunity to do: share selfies.

    Kylie Minogue wore a giant bow.

    Kylie Minogue wore a giant bow.

    Double-wide. So punk.

    Source: instagram.com

    Chanel Iman acted like she's friends with Beyoncé and Solange.

    Chanel Iman acted like she's friends with Beyoncé and Solange.

    Beyoncé and Solange were like, "Is this ironic?"

    Source: instagram.com

    Beyoncé and Solange also threw facial expression shade when they had to pose with Kim Kardashian.

    Beyoncé and Solange also threw facial expression shade when they had to pose with Kim Kardashian.

    Source: instagram.com

    Who managed to pose with just about everyone there, including Anne Hathaway's date, Valentino.

    Who managed to pose with just about everyone there, including Anne Hathaway's date, Valentino.

    Source: instagram.com


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    Turns out her hips don't lie.

    Here's Britney's latest Shape magazine cover.

    Here's Britney's latest Shape magazine cover.

    Source: muumuse.com

    On March 25, Britney was photographed in a bikini in Malibu.

    On March 25, Britney was photographed in a bikini in Malibu.

    These photos were probably snapped around the same time as her Shape photo shoot, maybe a little after.

    Via: FAMEFLYNET PICTURES

    Via: FAMEFLYNET PICTURES

    So how much was her cover retouched?

    So how much was her cover retouched?

    Via: FAMEFLYNET PICTURES


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    His secrecy has led to the cancellation of his Parsons class. Will he ever speak to the public about his scandal?

    Galliano after one of his fashion shows in 2004.

    Via: Jacques Brinon / AP

    John Galliano's Parsons class has been called off by the university. According to a letter signed by New School dean Joel Towers, president David E. Van Zandt, and provost Tim Marshall, the nature of Galliano's discussion with students — about his dismissal from Dior and the events that led to it — could not be agreed upon. The letter states this: "It was a condition of our agreeing to host Mr. Galliano that we also hold a larger forum, which would include a frank discussion of his career. Ultimately, an agreement could not be reached with Mr. Galliano regarding the details of that forum, and so the program will not move forward."

    Of course other factors could very well have played into Parsons' decision. Many were opposed to the appointment (a petition against him teaching there launched by students accrued more than 2,000 signatures). But to the school's statement, Galliano's lack of transparency about his scandal and tranformed self are exactly why he's having a hard time getting fully back to work. Because as long as thousands of people oppose him, he's never going to be trusted to sell fashion to thousands of people.

    That the seminar was planned at all seemed like evidence that Galliano was well on his way to the comeback the fashion industry has been greatly anticipating. Even directly following his dismissal, the pain of his "I love Hitler" declaration fresh in the minds of many, the fashion industry's most influential players expressed support for Galliano. And though the New School's Jewish student group opposed Galliano's class — about emotion in fashion design — the Anti-Defamation League was enthusiastic about the appointment. (Other Jewish leaders expressed indifference to Galliano's career moves, citing more pressing issues in the Middle East.) But even with the support of the ADL, Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, Condé Nast, and esteemed Parsons educators — plus a new job in the studio of the revered Oscar de la Renta — Galliano's comeback just refuses to gel. But why?

    Fashion is ripe for comebacks. This is an industry that just loves to scoop up a fallen star or shattered soul: Kate Moss not only returned to work after damning photos of her snorting cocaine hit British tabloid covers, but went on to launch a wildly successful Topshop line and double her salary; when Lindsay Lohan couldn't get any acting work, the house of Emanuel Ungaro hired her as creative director; Naomi Campbell only became a bigger badass after each report of her projectile cell phones surfaced in the papers. And those people aside, the industry makes no secret of idolizing troubled stars: Karl Lagerfeld made Amy Winehouse the muse of his 2007 Metiers d'Arts Chanel collection, sending models down the runway in a glamorized version of her trademark eyeliner and beehive. At the time, evidence suggested that Winehouse wasn't exactly the picture of health.

    So, with the industry largely on his side and its precedents in his favor, where is John Galliano now? Where's the grand comeback you would think is long overdue? Well, a few big things stand between him and his return to glory:

    1. There's nothing relatable about him or his offenses. A lot of people try drugs. Even President Obama has admitted to trying cocaine. There's something relatable about indulging one's impulse to use an illegal substance. But most people probably don't have a hard time refraining from saying, "I love Hitler," even if provoked by an unruly bar patron.

    2. He's been nothing but a Page Six shadow figure since Dior fired him. Rather than come out in a cover story, People magazine–style, to explain what happened and how everything's different now, all we've gotten are official statements of apology here and there. We need something bigger — a good 60 Minutes segment, or at least an interview in Vogue (a magazine which I'm pretty sure hasn't acknowledged his scandal at all, which is just bizarre). The public needs to hear Galliano himself discuss what happened like a normal person, because as his personal style and entire persona have suggested over the course of his career, he is an otherworldly individual of extreme creativity, which puts him on a different strata than 99.999% of the population. We need to see a glimmer of his humanity and normalcy.

    3. The ADL and Galliano are being cagey about what the designer has done to learn about Judaism and atone for his mistakes. The ADL is known to have "rehabbed" Galliano, after being connected to him by Anna Wintour and Condé Nast. The organization's national director Abraham Foxman told BuzzFeed Fashion recently in a statement: "John Galliano has met with ADL on numerous occasions. He has expressed remorse for his actions [and] made a clear and unequivocal apology for his words. He has met with rabbis and Holocaust scholars and has gone on an intellectual and moral pilgrimage to learn from his past mistakes. He has also offered to do volunteer work with fashion schools in Israel." But beyond official statements, the public hasn't seen Galliano doing this work. Well, why is his involvement with the ADL such a hush-hush operation? Parsons' Jewish Student Union President Jennifer Kaplan told BuzzFeed Fashion she felt like neither the ADL nor Galliano had given her organization proper proof of his moral retribution. Questioning his sentiments seems valid when the public has been assured of them only in canned statements. (When I interviewed Foxman following the announcement about the Parsons class, he said he and Galliano are "friends" but declined to go into specifics about their relationship.)

    In an era when we know everything about everybody thanks to social media, for a public figure like Galliano to maintain such privacy and communicate to the public only via statements can't help but create distrust. He was noticeably absent from Oscar de la Renta's runway show in February, though his influence was evident in the clothes themselves. Often after scandals, people return to the public spotlight eventually, compelled by a mission to govern or create or inspire. If Galliano wants to bounce back, he'll have to start taking his image into his own hands. At the very least, he'll have to prove he can carry on a gaffe-free conversation with a reporter.


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