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    Not that that will stop everyone from wanting them really badly anyway since they were on the Paris runways, and all.

    These Saint Laurent boots.

    These Saint Laurent boots.

    How many charm bracelets can you sew onto your shoelaces?

    Source: www

    These Alexander McQueen boots.

    These Alexander McQueen boots.

    These are basically studded leather socks with heels shoved into a metal toe covering. And they're amazing.

    Image by http://suicideblonde.tumblr.com/

    These Chanel boots.

    These Chanel boots.

    Another perplexing layering technique. Is this an over-the-knee white leather sock worn under oversized boots with Chanel purse straps? I don't know but WWD called these "an instant classic."

    Image by CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters

    These Chanel boots.

    These Chanel boots.

    GET THEM IN TAN!!!

    Image by CHARLES PLATIAU / Reuters


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    It's a sign: They don't want us to wear shirts anymore.

    Here's the latest cover of Glamour, starring Kate Hudson and her strategically positioned arm.

    Here's the latest cover of Glamour, starring Kate Hudson and her strategically positioned arm.

    Source: glamour.com

    Given that fashion magazines are supposed to sell us clothes — which one would think would require dressing cover models in more than jeans and pearls on chains — what gives?

    The recent Marc Jacobs show hints at a burgeoning topless conspiracy.

    The recent Marc Jacobs show hints at a burgeoning topless conspiracy.

    Image by Keith Bedford / Reuters

    — a push for women to ditch real clothes in favor of wildly expensive accessories that sell better and account for the bulk of luxury brands' revenue. Will they laugh at us when the trend catches on, and women everywhere just give up on legit shirts?

    Marc Jacobs sort of took the trend with him to Paris for his Louis Vuitton show.


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    Was there ever a more confusing and confused item of clothing? I think not.

    Lots of pairs are secretly see-through.

    Lots of pairs are secretly see-through.

    Source: imgur.com

    They don't look good in printed fabrics.

    They don't look good in printed fabrics.

    Source: i.imgur.com

    Via: pinterest.com

    These are "Napoleon Bonaparte" leggings.

    Source: www  /  via: havanaclub


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    Sliced bread is “unchic,” you guys.

    SHE'S BACK!

    SHE'S BACK!

    Source: bravotv.com

    After a horrible one million years without new episodes of The Rachel Zoe Project on Bravo, the high priestess of caftans returned to America's lives last night. Life is different for her — she's exited her pre-Skyler phase and entered her post-Skyler phase. She gets to put on a fashion show at Lincoln Center. She still has no say over how much jewelry her husband Rodger can wear at any one time. Even so! We can learn a lot from this fashion mogul, who, everyone but Anne-Marie Slaughter just might argue, has it all.

    Lesson 1: If you're going to make money off endorsing things call events by their rightfully sponsored names.

    Lesson 1: If you're going to make money off endorsing things call events by their rightfully sponsored names.

    Source: bravotv.com

    Rachel calls New York Fashion Week "Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week," which no one actually does because that would be like saying "did you see the Pepsi Super Bowl halftime show?" But Rachel is a brand, she is paid to endorse things/herself, and she is going to do the luxury car company right because maybe they're paying her? She did put on a fashion show in their tents. Maybe they also loaned her a black car.


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    In the latest round of fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan, and Paris, nearly 90% of models cast were white.

    Graphic by Kate Rushing.

    Via: foudre.co

    Paris Fashion Week just ended, bringing fall 2013 fashion month to an end. And, unsurprisingly but quite worrisomely, the models cast for the shows were overwhelmingly white, with black models and hispanic models landing a disconcertingly small share of runway jobs.

    Kate Rushing, a contributor to the site Style Minutes, which tracks runway model data, made the above infographic to emphasize just how bad this problem is getting. For her analysis, Rushing looked at 479 shows — more than the 413 Style.com posted of the fall 2013 collections. Following New York Fashion Week, Jezebel used Style.com's shows to analyze the racial breakdown of just that city's runways, finding that 82.7 percent of runway looks were shown on white models, 9.1 percent on Asian models, and 6 percent on black models.

    So, New York's runways were slightly more diverse than all four fashion capitals' runways combined, but they were still whiter than the previous show season (for which Jezebel found that 79.4 percent of fashion week jobs went to white models).

    At a recent panel discussion put on by the Model Alliance, an organization that advocates for better working conditions for models, founder and model Sara Ziff raise an interesting question about the industry's white ideal. "Would it be fair to say the fashion industry is racist?" she wondered. "There are very few industries that you could say, 'oh we're just not doing black girls this season,' which I've heard."

    So, is it?

    South Korean designer Lie Sang Bong's women's ready-to-wear fashion show at Paris Fashion Week.

    Image by Gonzalo Fuentes / Reuters


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    “Rihanna has what every girl aspires to have,” says the designer of Givenchy, who custom-made some looks. She is the face of her generation.

    This is one of the looks Givenchy custom-made for Rihanna to wear in her "Diamonds" tour.

    This is one of the looks Givenchy custom-made for Rihanna to wear in her "Diamonds" tour.

    The show started Sunday night in Buffalo, and the fashion highlights include custom looks by Kanye West's favorite label Givenchy. "I enjoyed making these looks: Rihanna represents what young and amazing means today. She is punk and talented," said Givenchy designer Riccardo Tisci. "She offers intelligence, energy and pure beauty. Rihanna has what every girl aspires to have. She is the face of her generation."

    Image by JT/MacFarlane/INFphoto.com

    Rihanna apparently enters Madonna-style with this cape and goggles (not sunglasses, goggles).

    Rihanna apparently enters Madonna-style with this cape and goggles (not sunglasses, goggles).

    Source: fashion.telegraph.co.uk

    She removes the cape to reveal this hooded jacket.

    She removes the cape to reveal this hooded jacket.

    Which she later removes to reveal the bedazzled high-waisted hipster panties you saw in image 1.

    Source: fashion.telegraph.co.uk

    Other looks are typical Rihanna.

    Other looks are typical Rihanna.

    Like this "wait, is she wearing a bra or just her arms?" ensemble.

    Image by JT/MacFarlane/INFphoto.com


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    “It makes monsters. It doesn't make gods, it makes monsters.”

    Going to fashion week nowadays feels like coming in and out of the same hotel where Justin Bieber is said to be having a drunken orgy — photographers are just everywhere, ready to pounce on anyone entering or exiting a building. The craziness of fashion week street-style photography and peacocking is the subject of Garage magazine's new internet documentary short, in which the fashion establishment finally says what they've been thinking for at least the past year: enough with this street-style nonsense already.

    Fashion critic Suzy Menkes already caused a kerfuffle several weeks ago with her "Circus of Fashion" essay in T magazine that lamented this very phenomenon. This shift in the conversation about street style feels akin to the ongoing one about what the internet means for fashion. Obviously you don't have to be at a fashion show to see what's going on there, or to form an opinion about the collection. You can look at the shows online, and then post your thoughts about them to Twitter or Tumblr or Facebook. Some fashion bloggers even become famous by doing this well enough to develop a huge following. And so the internet has democratized the historically elite business of fashion — inviting the uninvited to, if not the dinner table, at least cocktail hour. Some who have been in the business for several decades long for the pre-digital age, when bloggers didn't sit front row, you had to claw your way to the top and toil in fashion closets to get there, and fashion week was much more exclusive.

    Karl Lagerfeld in the '90s.

    Fashion week street style has its own history of elitism. The phenomenon began with photographers focusing on certain people, like Vogue Italia's Anna Dello Russo or blogger Susie Bubble, who went on to become famous for their personal style. If you weren't in the same rarified street-style strata as those folks, you might get noticed by wearing recognizable designer things (anyone who walks up to a fashion show wearing a full Prabal Gurung runway look is going to get attention, no matter who they are). But most people don't have access to those kinds of clothes. And now that street style has exploded to the degree that it has, those that do and don't are so anxious for attention that they'll just show up wearing their mop and the kitchen sink, whether it's Chanel or not. Street-style photographers need a lot of material and, surely finding it difficult to pick out the good style from the purely ridiculous style at fashion week now, take the bait.

    "Now that the number of photographers has outstripped the [showgoers]... you see the most banal people getting photographed," says fashion journalist Tim Blanks in the Garage film as the camera pans to a man wearing baggy pants covered in stuffed animals. Blanks says he's heard of people doing all kinds of crazy things (he doesn't get into specifics) to get the attention of famous street-style photographer Tommy Ton: "I just get so embarrassed for them," he says, his head in his hand. Phil Oh, one of the most famous street-style photographers, said it used to be easy to take photographs of editors at shows and make friends with them along the way, but now, there are so many photographers around that he can't do that: "It's become like trench warfare."


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    “The only group that really has it made are the white, straight, upper-class men,” said Sklar, a Sheryl Sandberg champion.

    Rachel Sklar.

    Image by Larry Busacca / Getty Images

    "The only group that really has it made are the white, straight, upper-class men. But that doesn't mean every man of that description is going to make it to the top," said Rachel Sklar, speaking at SXSW in Austin on Tuesday. "If life were a video game, that would be the easiest difficulty setting," she added, referring to John Scalzi's theory.

    Sklar, who noted that investors typically back a startup founder who is "a young male, usually a dropout of an Ivy League university," founded Change the Ratio, which seeks to increase the presence and opportunities for women in tech and new media. Her panel of the same name addressed the gender bias in the tech world, including the very conference she was speaking at.

    SXSW's interactive portion consists of dozens of panel discussions a day, each comprising four or five speakers. Conference organizers try to have at least one woman on each panel — but it doesn't always happen.

    Sklar opened her panel discussion by noting that an all-male panel was running at the same time as hers — "Transitioning Alternative Comedy to TV" — where comedians Chris Gethard, Fred Armisen, Marc Maron, and Scott Aukerman were going to talk about how to take a podcasts to television. "It's a panel of dudes, as comedy panels often are, and it really says something," Sklar said. She argued that the all-male lineup "suggests that it's a lot easier for dudes to take their podcasts to TV."

    Yet women are enjoying more visibility at the upper echelons of other industries. Kristin Jones, chief creative officer of internet television channel Vuguru, applauded the recent Sundance Film Festival, where "it was a huge deal, a huge milestone that they had 50% male and 50% female filmmakers" — for the first time in Sundance history. Yet as the tech world becomes more entwined with Hollywood, she hoped that "women will be able to retain a foothold."

    Kathleen Warner, the COO of Startup America, an organization that supports startups, said 42% of companies in the network are women-led, which is a higher number than most people expect. But, "I also think it's really key for women to step up," added Warner, who is involved with Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In efforts. "One of the biggest, most frustrating things" about her job are contests. While she might get a hundred ideas from men, "we're literally calling up women to do this."

    "It's hard, hard work to build companies," she added. "I understand the challenges around it, I understand the institutional challenges but... women have got to do it."

    Harvard Business School graduate Christina Wallace, cofounder of recently shuttered Quincy Apparel, had a theory about why women don't pitch as often as men do. Women outperform men at school, but at the same time, the education system "doesn't reward risk-taking," she argued. "Girls are really good at following the rules" in school, but "then we graduate and are like, now what are we supposed to do?" Sklar thinks "that's why no one wants to submit a pitch that's half-baked, even if that's the pitch that wins."

    One audience member asked the group if women were doing enough to support other women. "I sort of push back a little bit on the 'women don't help other women' thing," Sklar responded. "Why isn't there fretting about why men don't help men in the workplace? Because I personally know a lot of dudes who have knifed a lot of dudes in the back without thinking twice about it."

    Sklar added, "We've actually seen a ton of examples of women helping women, but it's been made official with Sheryl Sandberg's book [Lean In] and the infrastructure she's set up." (Sklar is on the Lean In launch committee.)

    How to behave in the workplace was a concern of another audience member — just how much can women afford to get in people's faces at work without rubbing them the wrong way?

    "I had a very good first boss-slash-mentor, and he's almost feared," said Vuguru's Jones. "He was kind of considered not very user-friendly, but what I learned from him was I'd rather be respected than popular," she added. "I really do carry that with me: I'd rather be respected than popular."

    All the panelists agreed that women working at tech companies need to, well, lean in and help create opportunities for themselves. But the companies also need to try to diversify their teams. Invoking Yoda to argue her point, Sklar said, "Do or do not— there is no try."

    "Isn't it about the results?" she continued. "Would you say, 'Sorry, sorry, sorry, I really tried' to your boss after you were supposed to deliver results?"

    She closed with the following: "Thank you all for not going to the adult-film panel next door." Where, for the record, men and women were equally represented.


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    Insiders wonder if Condé Nast promoted the Vogue editor in order to prevent her from leaving the company for another opportunity.

    Image by Felix Kunze / Getty Images

    On Tuesday Condé Nast announced that Anna Wintour would become artistic director of all the company's titles, an additional role to her duties as editor-in-chief of Vogue. The promotion puts a fork in years of rumors about Wintour leaving Vogue and Condé to retire or become an ambassador for President Obama, whose campaign she raised millions for in the 2012 election. Condé Nast Chief Executive Charles H. Townsend told the New York Times the artistic director job was created to help keep Anna at the company. But several Condé Nast staffers I spoke to outside of Vogue seem baffled by the move.

    "I would go to great distances to avoid losing Anna, particularly in the prime of her career," Townsend told the Times. Condé employees wonder if the promotion is a counter offer to another job Wintour was considering, and if so, what that job was. Of course, there's also some concern over just how Wintour will exact her influence on other publications — while photographers hired by Vogue are held to precise standards, those hired by other magazines have a lot more creative control over their work.

    Wintour did not specify what exactly she'd do in her artistic director role at the company. It's unclear if she'll work on covers or other photo shoots, but the Times piece and press release about her promotion fail to mention how she might influence the company's websites — which Condé has slowly been trying to improve in recent years — in this new role.

    This summer marks Wintour's 25th year as Vogue's editor in chief. So much for retirement.

    Image by Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images


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    Bit still awkward. What's with the stilted smile?

    Here's Michelle Obama's second "Vogue" cover, for the April issue.

    Here's Michelle Obama's second "Vogue" cover, for the April issue.

    There's something a bit stiff about it but it's slightly less stiff than her first cover for the magazine (below).

    Source: vogue.com

    The president also appears in the issue with Michelle.

    The president also appears in the issue with Michelle.

    Looking sort of awkward like most dads do in family portraits. (This was shot by Annie Leibovitz, mind you.)

    Source: vogue.com

    And then there's the obligatory shot of the subject looking pensively out a window, wearing a train.

    And then there's the obligatory shot of the subject looking pensively out a window, wearing a train.

    Source: vogue.com

    The FLOTUS first posed for the cover of "Vogue" following the 2008 election.

    The FLOTUS first posed for the cover of "Vogue" following the 2008 election.

    Vogue editor Anna Wintour was an even bigger fundraiser for Obama this election than last.

    Source: google.com


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    No fur vest required!

    Source: bravotv.com

    After a soft season five opener, The Rachel Zoe Project got hardcore fashion business on our asses when the second episode showed just how hard it is to maintain a creative vision as a designer along with commercial viability. It was like an issue of Forbes or the Economist, really, but with more sequins. The episode offered valuable lessons about what it takes to be pope of one's own fashion vatican.

    Read reviews of your fashion shows, even if it's painful.

    Read reviews of your fashion shows, even if it's painful.

    Source: bravotv.com

    "I just don't want anyone to say that my collection is cheesy or ugly," Rachel says over white dishes placed on the vast arrangement of furniture on her $8 million dollar-a-night patio overlooking Manhattan as she finds reviews of her first-ever runway show on the internet. "But as much as I don't want to see them, I have to know about them." It's like looking at photos of yourself on Facebook the night after you drank a lot with crazy people. You don't WANT to look, but you have to see the final product, however good or embarrassing it may be. Of course, the posts about Rachel's line (from the L.A. Times and always nice InStyle) were glowing, the way Rodger's pendants did in the sun on their amazing NYC balcony.


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  • 03/15/13--06:59: Topshop Says No To Fur
  • Even though it was one of fall's biggest runway trends.

    This is the window display at Topshop's London store.

    This is the window display at Topshop's London store.

    The retailer partnered with Peta to send the message to shoppers, "Keep wildlife out of your wardrobe." (The same cannot be said, apparently, of denim shorts cut like a diaper and worn over 20-year-old leggings.) But this is a bold stand for a store that shows at London Fashion Week and positions its merchandise as very trend-driven. Fur and exotic skins were among the biggest trends on the fall 2013 runways, so an outright rejection of it is ballsy. The store and Peta are encouraging shoppers to pledge to keep exotic skins out of their wardrobes. You can make your pledge here.

    Image by http://www.vogue.co.uk/news/2013/03/11/this-week-in-pictures---emma-watson-the-bling-ring-rihanna-diamonds-tour/gallery/955750


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    Don't want your magazine to sell? Put Taylor on the cover.

    Source: wwd.com

    The general, magazine-buying public would rather read about these people than Taylor Swift: Lauren Conrad, Zooey Deschanel, and Scarlett Johansson. All three celebrities proved better selling cover models than Swift, who continues her reign as one of the worst-selling cover stars at newsstands. And according to exclusive BuzzFeed data, she doesn't fare much better in terms of garnering pageviews online.

    While Taylor Swift was one of the worst-selling cover models of the six month period that ended in June 2012, Kate Moss, Kate Middleton, and Scarlett Johansson were among the best. So BuzzFeed's data team took a look at all articles about Swift, Moss, Middleton, and Johansson in BuzzFeed's network of more than 2,100 partner sites from January 2012 through March 2013. Taylor Swift was certainly written about the most, but garnered the second fewest page views per article on average.

    BuzzFeed's partner network includes sites like TMZ, Time.com, UsMagazine.com, NYmag.com, the Superficial, and Just Jared, among many other pop culture outlets. Despite dominating the number of stories written, Swift consistently failed to draw the most pageviews throughout the 15-month period analyzed, but was occasionally second to Middleton in pageviews per post.


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    “Anna Wintour would rather wear a Juicy Couture tracksuit with Crocs than even speak Kim Kartrashian's name.”

    Source: frauda.tumblr.com

    According to the latest tabloid reports, Kanye West is begging Anna — who likes him, by all accounts — to put Kim on a Vogue cover, which tends to be reserved for talented actors and singers and, you know, the first lady. This amazing collage summarizing the feud, illustrated with relevant photos of Kim's blood facial and Anna looking smug, appears on frauda.tumblr.com.

    Perhaps in her new role as artistic director of Condé Nast she'll methodically rid the company's magazines of the reality star and her disturbing peplum fanaticism.


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    This woman is writing her own pregnancy dress code — from peplum pants to leather leggings to the world's most painful-looking shoes, she's determined not to have a casual day, ever. Her resilience is amazing.

    Wear white pantsuits that make you look like you've been whipped to stiff peaks.

    Wear white pantsuits that make you look like you've been whipped to stiff peaks.

    If you're not Mary J. Blige and you're wearing a white pantsuit you have to be wary of looking like you're trying to be Mary J. Blige. With the excess fabric draping here, Kim avoids looking like a Mary knockoff WHILE distinguishing herself from her boyfriend's all-white (see below).

    Image by Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

    Don't be afraid to let your man shine white like a diamond.

    Don't be afraid to let your man shine white like a diamond.

    And wear all-black. It's not like people won't notice you, but it never hurts to act like you don't care if they don't by wearing clothes that make you fade into the surroundings, like an octopus on the sea bottom. No matter what, uncomfortable shoes are a must.

    Image by Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

    Channel the 2000s in Grecian-style, spaghetti strap wrap dresses.

    Channel the 2000s in Grecian-style, spaghetti strap wrap dresses.

    The important thing is to not remind people of eras prior to your inexplicable rise to mega fame, no matter how much everyone loves the '90s right now.

    Image by Jason Kempin / Getty Images

    Wear fitted leather whenever possible.

    Wear fitted leather whenever possible.

    Nothing will quite prepare your growing fetus for the badass life it's expected to lead — and the black leather diapers it's expected to wear — like a mom who wears enough tight leather to cause people to wonder if it's fused with her skin.

    Image by Chelsea Lauren / Getty Images


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    I love this woman.

    Source: google.com

    Source: stylethroughhereyes.tumblr.com

    Source: tumblr.com


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    Now that she's artistic director across titles… TENNIS, anyone?


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    It's the “all natural” (and I might add “all weird”) alternative to Botox.

    Source: popsci.com

    Recently Kim Kardashian grossed everyone out on the Internet by Instagraming the above photo of her face covered in a red substance that appeared to be blood. "#VampireFacial," she captioned the image. What, exactly, is she smoking? America collectively wondered. Veteran Madison Avenue plastic surgeon Dr. Theodore Diktaban jumped on the phone with me to explain WTF Kardashian's latest highly successful publicity ploy is all about.

    What is a blood facial? Do you perform them?
    Theodore Diktaban: I do perform them. Basically when you spin blood in a centrifuge, it separates into the red blood cells that fall to the bottom and the plasma part that rises to the top. You take off that plasma part which is rich in platelets which have a lot of anti-inflammatory properties and are rich in growth factors, and you can inject that by itself. It's called PRP or "platelet rich plasma." Or sometimes you can mix them with other fillers. You can also mix it with your own fat, so think of it as supercharged fat. You're going to use it for volume replacement.

    They call it "vampire lift" and all this other stuff. Other people are starting to do more and more with stem cells, which is basically taking fat and, through a process, extracting the stem cells instead of the platelet cells. So it's encouraging stuff.

    Why do people do this?
    TB: It's natural. Some people do not want some of the other fillers, so it affords them an alternative — a natural substance. It's flowing through our veins and you can extract it — the PRP part, it's not dangerous at all and it's safe. I had it injected into myself, an area of sports inflammation, and it knocked it out and that was a good result.

    We need more studies to show the real efficacies. Most of the stuff we know now is anecdotal.

    How long has this been around?
    TB: A couple years. One company is pushing it as the "vampire lift." But you're not injecting blood, you're injecting a component of the blood.

    I guess you think of it as red wine or white wine. You inject the white. (I just came up with that.)

    Good one. So, if this just involves injecting a clear substance into the face why does Kim Kardashian look like she smeared blood on her face?
    TB: That's not how you inject it, unless you had put it on topically. Most of the time you'd inject it like you do other fillers. It doesn't look like someone dripped blood, it almost looks like she had some facial resurfacing or something. It almost looks like dermabrasion — real deep dermabrasion. She could have matted [the red component] out with the towel to give that appearance. It's hard to make heads or tails of what she's doing. Maybe they gave her the red component and she went for the drama. Which we know she's capable of.

    Right, so there's no point in smearing blood on the face, is what you're saying.
    TB: I'm not sure what if any benefit there would be with the red cells. Maybe i'll start doing it to myself — draw my own blood and put it on.

    Kim Kardashian is 32 — does that seem like a good age for this?
    TB: That's starting a little too early. Most likely, late 30s on up is a good age. That's typical because the aging process really starts to accelerate when we get into our fourth ticket of life, so that's when you want to start considering doing more maintenance.

    And of course she's pregnant. Should pregnant women do this blood facial business or get other fillers while they're with child?
    TB: Well it's your own blood. I wouldn't mix it with the other fillers. But in general I would say, because I'm on the conservative side, leave well enough alone. You don't need to do this riht now — can't you wait another few months? God forbid something happens — people will say, oh was it the PRP that triggered the miscarriage, it was the PRP that caused whatever birth defect.

    Does it hurt?
    TB:It's not any different than a regular facial, in terms of the other fillers. Because you're going to be using the same instrumentation, so it's no different whether you're injecting the liquid of a plasma or the others which is more like a gel.

    Are people running in the door asking for blood facials now that the number one Kardashian is publicizing it?
    TB:I've had a few people inquire but they're not necessarily interested in doing it. They're more interested in finding out what's behind all this. Most people would be put off by blood on their faces. Obviously as a physician I'm used to seeing blood on an everyday basis, but for other people they're like, oh you've got to be kidding me.

    You don't say.


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    They care about their customers' embarrassment in yoga class. You can't say that about many companies, much less people.

    Image by Lucas Jackson / Reuters

    Lululemon just announced the recall of millions (billions?) of yoga pants because they are too sheer. The media had a field day with the story, because, why, how silly is this! The great yoga pants recall. Ha ha, what a silly Woman Problem, see-through yoga pants. Jimmy Kimmel even made a long skit about how ridiculous women who do yoga and want a pair of opaque tight pants are:

    But while he and morning show anchors are giggling, Wall Street analysts are not. One from Credit Suisse told the Wall Street Journal that the recall of the Luon pants was Lululemon's "fourth quality-control issue in the past year." The company — whose shares are down almost 13% so far this year — previously experienced "transparency problems" with bathing suits last spring, along with "a subset of light colored pants." The Journal continues:

    Some analysts expressed concern about the company's quality control.

    Analysts at Sterne Agee said the company doesn't appear to be exercising enough supervision of its supply chain.

    "We are concerned that LULU does not have the appropriate presence in and around its factories," the analysts said. "It appears that there is not appropriate oversight in place."


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    The star piece of the lot was the gown Diana wore to dance with John Travolta at the White House in 1985, which went for $363,000.

    Kerry Taylor Auctions just sold off ten dresses worn by Princess Diana. Collectively, they fetched £862,800 or $1,308,436 — an average of about $130,000 per dress. Ahead, see what each dress sold for (prices have been converted from pounds). Don't you love the '80s?

    Image by Simon Burchell / Getty Images

    Victor Edelstein green velvet evening gown: $36,396.

    Victor Edelstein green velvet evening gown: $36,396.

    From Edelstein's winter 1985 collection, this dress has a 24 inch waist (roughly the size of all of these), and was embellishment-free to emphasize Di's "willowy figure." Also, the "dark green velvet would have provided the perfect back-drop for fabulous jewels," the auction catalog notes. Diana wore it for her private fancy parties.

    Zandra Rhodes white chiffon cocktail dress: $72,792.

    Zandra Rhodes white chiffon cocktail dress: $72,792.

    Diana wore this dress, from Rhodes's fall 1985 collection, to a benefit in May of 1987.

    Image by Jayne Fincher/Getty Images

    Burgundy velvet sheath with tail coat, by Catherine Walker: $76,431.

    Burgundy velvet sheath with tail coat, by Catherine Walker: $76,431.

    Walker was one of Diana's favorite designers. She wore this dress for the state visit to Korea in 1992 and to the premiere of Steel Magnolias in 1990.

    Image by News (UK) Ltd / Rex USA


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