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  • 08/14/12--14:36: Paul Ryan's One Fashion Rule
  • Wear everything HUGE.

    Over the past few days, you may have found yourself thinking, "Why, is that a gingham sail or is it one of Paul Ryan's shirts?" Unless you were somewhere *really* preppy, it was probably just one of Ryan's shirts. Wherever he goes, there they are those shirts, folding over the waistbands of his baggy pants while he gestures at a sea of Romney posters.

    Image by Steve Pope / Getty Images

    Or bunching up around the belly button when he weeps on stage.


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    Apparently she jokes about it in that way that's like “I don't really care,” when it's pretty clear she does. All together now: awwww .

    Source: media.vogue.com

    From Vogue's lengthy September issue profile of Chelsea:

    Lately, Chelsea Clinton has been deadpanning jokes about how impatient her mother is for grandchildren. She lands the best one like a Vegas pro at the Vital Voices gala at the Kennedy Center in early June, the first event in fifteen years at which Hillary, the organization’s founder, couldn’t be present (Azerbaijan). “I am proud of my mom for many, many reasons,” says Chelsea, in sleeveless black Chanel, “but one of the reasons that I’m chiefly proud of her is the legacy that she will leave as secretary of State. That women’s voices won’t only be a vital part of how America is seen around the world, but a central part of how we . . . try to build a better world for—if she were here she would say—the grandchildren she hopes to have.” The comedy was all in the timing, and she brought down the house.

    When I ask later if the joke is true, Chelsea says, “Yes, but in the most loving sense. She always tells me it was the greatest thing that ever happened to her. And as the subject of such an amazing compliment, I can’t do anything but be grateful and smile and say that I’m confident that I will feel the same way when I am so blessed. It’s certainly something that Marc and I talk a lot about. I always knew I was the center of my parents’ lives when I was growing up. And I am determined that our children feel the same way. Marc and I are both working really hard right now, but I think in a couple of years, hopefully . . . literally, God willing. And I hope my mom can wait that long.”

    Via: vogue.com


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    Despite audiences not having fully recovered from the stress of Mary and Matthew's romance last season (at least, I haven't), it looks like the writers are stirring up trouble for them once again.

    The new season starts September on ITV in the U.K. and January 2013 on PBS in the U.S. (Life, it is unfair.) In the meantime, get your fix with these Downton Abbey GIFs!

    Attitude:

    Attitude:

    Source: http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m3gmaepSwd1r4q4d2o1_500.gif

    Source: http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m3gm9j7q7d1r4q4d2o1_500.gif


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    Paul Ryan suffers from a common problem men with his tall, lanky figure have: his clothes make him look like he's drowning in a sea of fabric. You (or your boyfriends/husbands) can get avoid this with the right brands and a few simple guidelines.

    Source: s3-ec.buzzfed.com

    After highlighting the problem of Paul Ryan's supersized suits and gingham shirts, his rep emailed, "The American people are asking, where are the fitted shirts?" Well, American people, I will tell you! Let's look at options by brand — American brand.

    J. Crew: the Ludlow Suit.

    J. Crew: the Ludlow Suit.

    J. Crew may be a classic MObama brand, but if Ryan can get past that, the Ludlow suit is apparently a great option for him. Described by a men's stylist friend of mine as a "go-to for guys looking for a more modern fit," this style comes in a variety of fabrics (some lighter for spring, some heavier for faull) with a cut that flatters a lot of figures while maintaining a slim fit. This two-button jacket is $425 (you can add a monogram for $10) while the pants are $225.

    Source: s7d9.scene7.com

    J. Crew also makes a Ludlow shirt — in gingham, which is key/screams proud American — for $88. (The shirt comes in a varieties of fabrics so you're not confined to gingham.) Try the slim cut.


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    “Memorizing lines and trying to, like, say 'em and still, like, do movement and all — that was hard.”

    In this Access Hollywood clip, Ryan continues his streak of lovably dumb interviews. Actually he seems unbelievably sweet when he says, "Before I was training so much I didn't have time for a girlfriend because I wanted to give that perfect someone my heart" — but then he claims he thinks The Bachelor will help him find someone to settle down with and it's all ruined. And then he says he wants to date Blake Lively and it's all ruined some more.

    In more uplifting news, some lucky woman on the 90210 set got to put makeup on his pectorals.


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    Despite women earning more degrees than men, men outnumber women in the field of math by an alarming degree. A former Wonder Years star is on a mission to make young women know they're just as good at math as their male counterparts.

    Source: ecx.images-amazon.com

    Danica McKellar just released her fourth math book for girls, Girls Get Curves. It's designed to teach girls math but also confidence so that they don't shy away from pursuing it in college or their careers beyond. Playing off the geometry focus, the book also tries to teach young women how to have a positive body image in a world that tries to keep them from it. McKellar speaks to BuzzFeed Shift about why women are so underrepresented in mathematics, her own experiences in the field, and more.

    The number of women pursuing careers in math and science — or simply exhibiting talent in these fields — has become a hot topic. Why do you think that is?
    Girls and boys score the same in high school on average in math — most people don't realize that. Most people think that girls don't score as well as boys, but that's not the issue — the issue is girls' confidence. The way they see themselves is different from boys, so that results in girls dropping math as soon as they can because they think they can't handle it. Because they're dropping these courses they're not pursuing these careers.

    I had a friend in college who wanted to be a doctor and she was so intimidated by the number of calculus classes she was going to have to take that she dropped out. My real goal is for women to come away from my books knowing they can handle the math, they can do it. They're master of their domain — "I got this."

    Why do you think girls and women have this confidence problem?
    It's got to be from all the messages we get from society all day long. People tell us our value lies in our appearance, and that's what we need to focus on instead of realizing hair and makeup and fashion — that's all fun but it's really decoration. It's not where our value lies, and it's not where our self-esteem should come from, because that's extremely damaging. Girls forget that the things that are going to make them feel happy and fulfilled are the things you do from the inside — like succeeding in math. If you look at a really hard math problem, and you persevere and you do solve it, then you build internal fortitude, and you see that you're stronger and smarter.

    And why do you think high grades don't give girls more confidence in their mathematical skills?
    I wish I had a better answer as to the question of why girls think they can't handle it. I scored a 5 on the AP BC calculus test in high school, and I got to college and if I think back to who I thought could handle a college math class, I thought a guy — yeah, that person looks the part. I'm so glad I went for it anyway because I scored at the top of the class and my professor came to me and said, "Who are you?" All of the professors didn't have televisions [and know The Wonder Years], but I was able to define myself differently.

    Danica on the Wonder Years.

    Source: ia.media-imdb.com

    Do you think that was important to your success as a mathematician?
    I couldn't believe I scored the best of the 160 people on the midterm. And I said maybe it doesn't matter if I "look the part" or not — maybe I can do this. So my books are designed to break the stereotype of who's good at math. That person might look like Einstein or the person who can be on the cover of a magazine. As human beings we are so prone to suggestion. You give men and women a test, and if you start off saying women score about the same as men, they do about the same. If you tell women they won't do the same on the test, they won't do the same on the test.

    Girls can define themselves however they want to and they don't have to choose between being the fabulous cute girl and the smart girl. You can build your smarts by doing things like math — by doing things like that you can be more fabulous.

    How did you feel about that op-ed in the Times arguing that algebra isn't necessary?
    Oh my God, it was absolutely ridiculous. (I read a bunch of rebuttal pieces to it so I might be quoting some of their ideas, but seriously, they made some good arguments.) But, do we use European history every day? Do we use English literature every day? Most of the stuff you study in school you don't use every day. He's making the argument that you may as well cut off education after sixth grade. The other thing is by not making algebra available and required for everybody, you start creating these new class lines — the educated and not educated — where only the people who can afford it can have access.

    I couldn't believe the fact that he was discounting learning how to problem solve. Learning how to debate or learning how to make a good argument — these are the reasons we study things in school. It's not because we think we can memorize that piece of literature — it's to teach kids how to make a good argument. In math you learn how to problem solve. That's why you study algebra, that's why you need it and that's why you don't stop at remedial math.

    Do you think there’s still a lingering perception that attractive women aren’t smart? That being interested in one’s appearance can’t coexist with intelligence?
    I think about myself and my own perceptions about that. If you see a woman who spent a lot of time on her appearance, maybe you think she didn’t have time for anything else. In terms of a woman who’s naturally beautiful, I think it’s cruel to pigeon-hole people and think they can only be one or the other. If you’re a 14-year-old girl and you have to choose between being pretty and the smart one? Most girls are going to choose the one that’s going to make them popular (pretty).

    Part of the reason we don’t see hot women being portrayed on TV as mathematicians and scientists is because Hollywood wants to take shortcuts. If a character comes in that’s supposed to be a scientist, they go for someone who looks like Einstein. If you have a beautiful woman come in that’s a scientist, it’s going to take more time to explain to the audience. I don’t think Hollywood’s just evil and trying to keep women down, I think they just tend to look for an easy way out.

    After being a child star on the Wonder Years, how did you avoid burnout when you went onto college?
    I have to give credit to my parents for keeping me really gorounded and for never over-emphasizing the importance of being on the Wonder Years. I was going to the Wonder Years but I was also going to high school, and I had chores when I came home. I never had a question about whether I was going to go to college or not. The high school I went to was Harvard Westlake and nobody there didn’t go to college. So when I got to UCLA, I said the Wonder Years is over, and I thought what will I do now? I wanted to be a film major but then took the math class and I just got hooked. I thought, I love this, I’m good at it, and I was sort of high off that. For a while I thought I might become a professor myself but I did find that kind of work a bit isolating. When you’re writing a professional math paper only a few people are going to read it. And I get to go out and talk to a lot of people about math and it’s just a different life.

    How do you feel about photoshopping in media? It’s something that’s constantly debated.
    In the book I talk about how we can’t compare ourselves to the images in magazines — the’y’re not real. If you want to aspire to look like somebody, aspire to look like somebody you have in your real life.

    I also have a section about how advertisements are designed to make us feel bad about ourselves, because if we’re not happy about how we look we don’t need their products. So it’s in the advertisers’ best interest to make us look less than. It’s really damaging — it’s damaging to girls and it’s not going to stop. So I’m hoping to give them a different perspective."


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    The Russian feminist punk band was sentenced to two years in prison this morning for “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred.” The band was arrested in March following an unauthorized performance at Moscow's main Russian Orthodox cathedral where they screamed, “Mother Mary please drive Putin away.”

    Pussy Riot's three members sat in a glass cell in a Moscow court room this morning, holding up the judge's verdict.

    Pussy Riot's three members sat in a glass cell in a Moscow court room this morning, holding up the judge's verdict.

    Image by Mikhail Metzel / AP

    The protests followed quickly.

    The protests followed quickly.

    Here, a protester wearing a mask (ski masks are one of Pussy Riot's signatures) waves a feminist flag from a balcony of the court building in Moscow.

    Image by Misha Japaridze / AP

    Outside the Moscow court building, other outraged supporters gathered.

    Outside the Moscow court building, other outraged supporters gathered.

    Image by ANDREY SMIRNOV / Getty Images

    This sticker on the side of a police van reads "Free Pussy Riot!"

    Image by ANDREY SMIRNOV / Getty Images


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    On August 1 Olympic beefcake Ryan Lochte applied to trademark “jeah” — a word he may or may not have made up himself, but that appears in # form all over his Twitter feed and Lochte-branded merchandise. He's apparently doing this so that he can merchandise more crap. Ahead, some ideas for him.

    Jeah Nail Art

    Jeah Nail Art

    Ryan will want to capitalize on his female fan base by offering some special things just for the ladies. What better way to get them to love him even more (like, so that they spend money on his JEAH nonsense) than starting a JEAH nail art craze?

    Suggested price: $8.99 for each set of stickers, which will ideally be made available at most major drug stores.

    Jeah Goggles

    Jeah Goggles

    You know, like beer goggles. Unisex.

    Suggested price: $14.99. They should be the new version of those plastic neon shades that bars hand out way too much these days.

    Jeah Grill

    Jeah Grill

    He would obviously be remiss not to include some sparkly dentures.

    Suggested price: $1,299. The high/low mix thing is very "now" and could work nicely in Ryan's product line.

    Jeah Kitty Litter

    Jeah Kitty Litter

    Because cats demand the best, too.

    Suggested price: $16.99, which may seem high but at least lets you know you're getting something special.


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    Dieting and owning Chanel bags have nothing to do with it.

    I am just starting college and very interested in pursuing a career in fashion. I'm not sure what I want to do but am thinking something on the business end or perhaps fashion journalism. What advice do you have to help me get on the path toward this career?

    Ooh ooh advice column list time!

    Put your ego aside.

    Put your ego aside.

    Note: this is an old photo, taken prior to Madonna's "Gaga stole 'Born This Way'/down with Gaga" nonsense.

    Source: load.kovideo.net

    A lot of the tips on this list would apply to ANY job and this is one of them. None of the people able to give you your first big break want to deal with an entitled intern or entry-level employee who thinks they can pick all their projects and skirt the grunt work because their head is swollen with delusions about how fabulous they are and what they should be doing. Especially in fashion, where many egos thrive already (some are deserved and feel mildly excusable while some are just totally obnoxious) you need to be willing to do anything enthusiastically.

    When I say anything, I don't mean it in the Devil Wears Prada sense. I mean filing, research, picking out buttons, packing up borrowed dresses — not glamorous things. The fashion industry has a reputation for treating interns and employees very badly, thanks to The Devil Wears Prada, but not ALL offices are like that. A lot of them are crazy, some more tolerably than others, but a lot just have a lot of grunt work that needs to get done. Do it well, hide how much you hate it if you do, and you will be rewarded. And if someone asks you to do something totally unreasonable, like clip their cat's nails, then quit! There is a difference between grunt work and abuse.

    Look for an internship.

    Look for an internship.

    Sean Avery posing for a story about his Vogue internship (yes, really happened) a few years ago.

    Source: images.nymag.com


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    He's apparently taken down his private Facebook account and is trying to lay low. But he should really probably own up to the photos, apologize, and start trying to diversify the things he's known for online.

    The Sun's cover story on the photos; the paper was the only one to run with this even after the royal family's lawyers asked them not to.

    Image by TOBY MELVILLE / Reuters

    Today's Google results of Prince Harry's name:

    So that's still going on. And the story is just the latest reminder of just how sticky the internet is. Any famous person who's ever been photographed naked knows this. Anyone who's ever tweeted something embarrassing knows this. Since we all stare at this thing all day long, plastering it with so much personal — and arguably narcissistic — content, at all hours and in various states of sobriety, entire companies have emerged that do nothing but manage people's online personas. Reputation.com is one. Think of them as publicists or image stylists for anyone unhappy with what pops up when they Google themselves. Like Prince Harry.

    Even though he's not heir to the throne and weathers these scandals more easily than his married brother would, he still has to weather them. So far his strategy seems to have consisted of lying low — ignore it and maybe the tabloids will stop with the balls puns, already! Except, no, that's not how this works. And despite the privileges afforded to Harry as a royal (naked pool parties in ostentatious Vegas hotel suites that would be inaccessible to the average person, let's say) he still has to go to work, which means he can only hideout for so long. Today he returns to his helicopter pilot job at the Royal Air Force Wattisham base, where he "will have formal interviews with Lieutenant Colonel Thomas de La Rue and the Head of Army, General Sir Peter Wall, who will ultimately decide how reprimand Harry for the scandal," Us Weekly reports. And so the story continues developing, as the prince tries to get it under control. Along with lying low, he's reportedly taken down his Facebook page, which was encrypted with a pseudonymn anyway. From Us:

    "Because all of the Vegas drama he's frozen his account," the source explains. "No more Facebook for Harry for a while. He'll probably come back online in the future, but, for now, he's been advised to go offline."

    He obviously can't put the toothpaste back in the tube, but he can at least try to wash it down the drain. Polly Wood, a senior member of the Special Projects team at Reputation.com, says the best way to manage one's online persona is to push the embarrassing Google results down the page by flooding the zone with content that portrays you the way you want people who Google you to see you. The first step in that process, she says, is owning up to the thing that's ruining you. "Walking away and acting like it didn't happen is just going to fuel the fire more," she says. If you own up to it and move forward, people are more forgiving online. I think it's foolish to not engage and represent yourself."

    Taking down his private Facebook page won't help the matter — he's not the one who took the photo of himself naked holding his package and posted it to Facebook anyway. "He needs to really work to get separate, positive content to be more visible in his search results," Wood says. He might launch a "Prince Harry Wearing Clothes and Holding Kittens" Tumblr, for instance.

    The good news for celebrities who are covered all the time is that eventually these stories do get pushed down the page (only 3 percent of Googlers click over to page two). When you Google "Blake Lively," her naked photos don't come up on top anymore. Though those might not hurt her ability to land movie roles, such scandals might hurt a celeb in other ways. Even if you're really hot and seem like a nice person overal, brands might not want you for endorsement deals and Vogue might not want you for a cover in the wake of such a scandal.

    Some celebrities do handle these things well, Wood says. Ashton Kutcher's "very good, diverse online presence" stands out, in fact. "He's been good about using social media consistently to help make negative stuff less sticky." After this happened not that long ago, check out the top Google result for his name:


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    The brand just introduced its ” push-up sports bra ,” which comes outfitted with “push-up padding for lift & cleavage.” Leave it to VS to figure out that the average sports bra just isn't enough like underwear.


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    Last week, France's President Francois Hollande stripped the designer of his Legion of Honor medal. Here's why that matters.

    Galliano, following one of his shows, in January 2011.

    Last week French President Francois Hollande signed the order to strip scandalized designer John Galliano of his Legion of Honor award medal. This is unusual, but hardly unheard of: each year a handful of the roughly 100,000 medal holders lose their awards, which go to those who have distinguished themselves through military service or who have contributed to France in some other significant way (Galliano received his medal in 2009 for his contributions to French couture). But Hollande's decision is probably not the end of Galliano's embarrassment as his legal dispute with Dior makes its way through the French court system.

    University of Maine law professor and French constitutional law expert Martin Rogoff says that under French law, medal holders have their awards taken away if they're convicted of certain crimes. People convicted of serious crimes are automatically stripped of their medals, while other lesser criminals lose them at the President's discretion. Galliano was convicted of one of these lesser crimes — "public insult" — for his anti-Semitic outburst at a Parisian café.

    Last month, Hollande visited infamous French Holocaust site Vel d'Hiv, where 13,000 Jews were held in the summer of 1942 before being deported to death camps in Auschwitz. In a statement about the 70th anniversary of this event, Hollande said "everywhere [anti-Semitism] appears it must be exposed and punished." Thus, says Rogoff, stripping Galliano of his medal "is a similar kind of gesture to apologizing [for] the French enforcing the Nazi anti-Jewish policies," and "does have some symbolic value."

    Galliano's next headache is the complaint he filed against Christian Dior for letting him go in March 2011. The Conseil des Prud’hommes, which oversees labor disputes between employees and employers, told Women's Wear Daily Galliano had a hearing scheduled for this past February 4, but did not provide further details. The way these cases work is two members who represent workers and two members who represent managers investigate the complaint, compiling a dossier of information, including witness testimonials, and make a ruling.

    "The standard for individual firings is there has to be 'real and serious' grounds for dismissal," Rogoff explains. Dior could argue that Galliano's conviction would hurt the company's bottom line, while Galliano could argue Dior only fired him because they didn't want to pay his high salary (Galliano is rumored to be seeking about $19 million from Dior, according to WWD). If the Conseil is unable to agree upon an outcome (four investigators leaves the possibility of a tied decision), the case will make its way through higher courts. The Conseil's witness interviews are likely to include some juicy information, though it's unclear whether records of those interviews will make their way to the press. If a verdict is reached, it will be made public.

    Whatever happens, February is when Paris Fashion Week starts anew, and Dior will surely want to wrap this Galliano business up quickly so that the fashion world can focus on their new designer — Raf Simons — and whatever collection he shows.

    The French legal system is not unlike the fashion industry in that it tends to be forgiving (for instance, prison terms tend not to be that harsh and are commonly revoked, Rogoff says). Though Galliano's next career move remains unclear a year and a half after his firing, what seems certain is that there will be a move. Vogue editor Anna Wintour has been seen meeting with Galliano, and is said to have a keen interest in helping him find a new job. She is hardly alone as a top player in the fashion industry who is eager to forgive him.

    As Kate Moss and even Naomi Campbell's continued success has proved, scandal does not keep someone who is adored by the fashion industry from being one of the most important, celebrated people in the business. To this quite small yet quite influential group of people, Hollande and the Conseil's opinions may be as significant as last season's shoes.


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    It was the perfect thing to wear to deliver a speech about “love.” But it didn't tell us much about Ann.

    Tuesday morning Ann Romney said she didn't know what she was going to wear later to deliver her RNC speech.

    "The verdict is still out on what I’m going to wear, which is amazing," she told the Wall Street Journal. The remark fit with her style on the campaign trail so far: she always looks put-together but her outfits retain a flavor of being casually assembled in the morning without the help of a stylist. Like the clothes of average people. But her look tonight — a crisp, bright tomato red dress by Oscar de la Renta* paired with perfectly matched lipstick and coordinating gold jewelry — looked impossibly polished. She looked fabulous, but in a hyper-perfected in a way that many of her previous outfits haven't been. It was just the kind of look that defined, style-wise, Michelle Obama's predecessors.

    Before Michelle Obama, the de facto fancy outfit for a first lady, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush included, was an A-line Oscar de la Renta dress. One reason Michelle Obama received so much attention for her clothes from such an early stage of her husband's presidential campaign is that she bucked this trend in so many ways. She's never worn Oscar de la Renta publicly, instead favoring H&M and J. Crew dresses at the opposite end of the price spectrum. She loves clothes by lesser known designers, like Jason Wu (whose business her famous patronage has given a huge boost). And you never really know if she'll show up in an asymmetrical cardigan by a Japanese designer, a crisp Alexander McQueen blouse, or a J. Crew sweater set. Michelle's clothes are unpredictable enough to be wildly celebrated by the fashion world, yet for the most part safe enough to serve her just fine as first lady. Here, in the most unlikely of offices, was a true fashion cheerleader.

    Ann Romney's wardrobe tends to benefit from the same down-to-earth spontaneity that governs Michelle Obama's clothing choices. While she plays it relatively safe in three-quarter sleeve jackets and long-sleeved blouses, she mixes prints, has fun with statement necklaces, and throws on a pair of jeans from time to time.

    Ann's tomato RNC outfit was perfect, if not terribly interesting as a piece of fashion, and failed to embody the spontaneous spirit her wardrobe and even rhetoric is known for. Her look was much more Laura Bush than Michelle Obama — almost painfully aware of how political wives can mess up the clothing thing from time to time. One of Ann's most controversial moments on the campaign trail may have been when she wore a $990 designer tee-shirt with a bird on it for a television appearance. Michelle Obama has faced her fare share of wardrobe criticism as well, for wearing what some thought was an aesthetically displeasing cardigan on election night in '08, and for wearing a British label (Alexander McQueen) to a state dinner honoring China.

    Ann's outfit Tuesday night doesn't seem likely to garner that kind of criticism. At most, she might be faulted for wearing expensive things. But the labels of her clothes, jewelry, and shoes aren't readily apparent, and the left-wing fashion industry isn't likely to send around press releases to announce that Ann wore a certain label's stuff, making the entire cost of her outfit more difficult to calculate. Her outfit was about as safe as giving a speech about "love." It was the sort of bland, sort of not bland sartorial equivalent of her enthusiastic delivery of the phrase, "I love you, women!" No one would disagree, but it's hardly personal.

    *This post has been updated to include the designer of Ann's dress, Oscar de la Renta.


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    The magazine publishes straightforward political coverage for an engaged audience of millions of women. Romney's turn.

    Source: media-cache-ec0.pinterest.com

    Of all the things Republicans attack President Obama for, his decision to give an interview to Glamour, which reaches millions of women in print and online each month, may be one of the hardest to justify. Editor-in-chief Cindi Leive recently interviewed Obama in Portland, Oregon for the November issue — news some Republicans are turning into a talking point about how Obama isn't serious about the Serious Issues up for debate this election. "President Obama continues to subject himself to the toughest of questions from the most rigorous of publications," the National Review's Jim Geraghty wrote, sarcastically. "The grumbling about Obama’s fluff interviews would be quieter if the country were in a time of peace and prosperity, or if he hadn’t gone close to eight weeks without a press conference," he added in a follow-up email to WWD.

    But like other fashion magazines — Vogue, for example — Glamour has a history of highlighting politicians (and their wives and families) from both parties. In 2008 Lieve interviewed then-president George W. Bush for Glamour. He talked a lot about his wife, Laura, and his daughter, Jenna. Lieve asked him about his smoking habit and his decision to veto a tax on cigarettes that might have encouraged some smokers to quit. It was mostly light-hearted, but it wasn't devoid of political discussion. And with all the candid quotes he gave about his wife and daughters, the interview made him seem like an actual human who, oh hey, also understands women.

    Glamour is evidently aware that its millions of readers span both parties and seems anything but interested in alienating any of them. Take a look at their political news coverage online, and you'll find unbiased articles on the Republican National Convention, Paul Ryan's appointment as Romney's running mate, and the Supreme Court's ruling on the Affordable Care Act. The readers of these posts, judging by their responses, are an engaged group. Take a look at the comments on a story headlined, "BREAKING: Paul Ryan Is Mitt Romney's VP Pick! Well, What Are Your Thoughts?"

    And here are some responses to a poll Glamour.com ran about the Affordable Care Act, two weeks after the Supreme Court upheld it:


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    Model Coco Rocha is certainly no stranger to photo manipulation. Are little old ladies' paintbrushes and photoshop really all that different, after all?

    Source: http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m9gxbpinDn1qeyuguo1_1280.jpg

    Via Coco Rocha's Tumblr.


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    Well, it's not like people come out the womb in the shape of a perfect purple vase, you know.

    The "before" picture is from a behind-the-scenes montage of the shoot released by Vogue and this cover's photographers, Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott. Sometimes I wonder why people bother with the original photography anymore when the end result is basically just a photo illustration.


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    Well! He can tell full stories, establish narrative, and even repeat the same lines over again in different conversations!

    Video by Michael Schmidt.

    Earlier: Ryan Lochte: Great At Swimming, Less Great At Talking About Swimming


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    I sure hope so. If Snooki can do it this cat is a shoe-in.

    Why, what could this video possibly mean?

    View Video ›

    Choupette's owner, Karl Lagerfeld, does a line for Net-a-porter, so I'm hoping that this means Choupette's own line is forthcoming.

    In case you've been longing for a video visualisation of what Choupette's life is like, Net-a-porter put that together for you, too:


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    Prettier than it does everywhere else. (Also, did you know that basically everything comes in FLAG?)

    On Pinterest, the RNC is just like being at the beach.

    On Pinterest, the RNC is just like being at the beach.

    Image by Scott Olson / Getty Images

    Baked goods express political memes.

    Baked goods express political memes.

    Cookies obviously look this way.

    Cookies obviously look this way.

    Here's an adorable way to serve caprese salad with olive oil pipettes.

    Here's an adorable way to serve caprese salad with olive oil pipettes.

    Totally works for the RNC even though they didn't dye the basil leaves blue.


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    Sorry, everyone.

    Want to "win" a conversation over drinks tonight? Here you go. (Note: for the sake of this script and the reality that you really can't rehearse this with an actual human if you don't want to be the Worst Person Ever, a real person has been substituted with the inanimate object of the year: a chair.)

    Chair: Oh my God did you hear Here Comes Honey Boo Boo beat the RNC in ratings?

    You: That can't be true. Even if Honey Boo Boo is the new Jersey Shore (like, first season Jersey Shore when you could still like it ironically before all the legitimate Jersey Shore fans came to the fore, and it became like another Kardashians) there's no way it beat all the cable and network news coverage combined.

    Chair: Uh, do you LOOK at the internet? Everyone reported that HBB got higher ratings than the RNC.

    You: Yes, I do look at the internet. In fact I look at the internet so much that my dreams are like a sequence of disorganized Chrome tabs. And I did see that the Hollywood Reporter said that HBB topped the RNC in ratings. However, the total viewership of the episode of Boo Boo that ran Wednesday night, when Paul Ryan spoke, was 3 million, and the total viewership of the RNC was about 20 million.

    Chair: Dude, no. It's obvious that Democrats were watching HBB.

    You: Maybe you read that somewhere, but I don't think that's true. I don't think you can say that, based on the number of people that watched an unrelated television program, that a certain other television program has a partisan viewership. But back to the original topic: what the Hollywood Reporter actually reported is that if you compare a specific demographic of people watching Honey Boo Boo to the same demographic watching individual networks' RNC programming, Honey Boo Boo got more viewers. But the RNC is covered by tons of network and cable news channels, and cumulatively, they still got 20 million viewers during the RNC — roughly seven times HBB's 3 million.

    Chair: But the ratings were higher.

    You: That's true — the ratings for certain demographics were higher. Among television viewers ages 18 to 49, Honey Boo Boo got a 1.3 rating. Meanwhile, Fox News landed a slightly lower rating of 1.2. But what those numbers mean is that 1.3 and 1.2 percent of all households with people ages 18 to 49 who own televisions were tuned into these respective programs. Now, TV Newser tells us: 'From 10-(just after) 11PM, when the broadcasters were live, [Fox News Channel] averaged 7.70 million total viewers, including 2.07 million in the key adults 25-54 demo.' So overall, Fox News has more than twice the number of viewers that Honey Boo Boo did. However in that demographic, it and all the other networks individually did not have more viewers than Honey Boo Boo.

    Chair: Oh...

    You: I get that it's tempting to sensationalize the story (because Honey Boo Boo is nothing but sensation, only in the opposite kind of way someone like, say, Beyoncé is). But more people actually tuned into what many would agree was the newsiest thing happening on Wednesday night. What's actually interesting about the RNC ratings is not how they stack up to Honey Boo Boo's, but how they compare with the 2008 RNC ratings. TV Newser reports that the ratings for the second night of the RNC in 2008, looking at Nielsen-rated networks, was 37 million. So you might say the real story here is that the RNC ratings were down 17 million, which is a lot. And what's interesting about that is that Sarah Palin spoke on the second night of the RNC in '08, but wasn't invited to speak this time around (a decision some questioned since she's seen as an energizing figure within the party).

    Chair: Well, I guess that's good. I mean, I would never watch Honey Boo Boo over the RNC. As an intellectual, I loathe "lowest common denominator" television.

    You: Yes, we should all be thankful that the wider interests of the nation encompass harder news than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo on TLC. And Jersey Shore's next season will be its last so, you know, glimmers of hope! And I get that it sucks that if we actually look at this thing closely, and analyze the reporting a little bit, we lose out on quite a few sensationalistic blog headlines. But look at it this way: after Clint Eastwood's big moment we really don't need to look for ways to semi-fabricate sensationalistic news.

    Chair: True. He's done more for my profile than I could have ever dreamed of. Just call me Honey Chair Chair.

    You: Touché.

    Scene.


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