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    This is Roberto Cavalli’s dream. Is it yours too?

    Roberto Cavalli with some models at the Life Ball.

    Via: Hans Punz / AP

    "A princess should be sexy," Roberto Cavalli told British Vogue. "She is young, she is beautiful — I would like to create something special for her, but nothing too bold. I would like to prove to the world that Roberto Cavalli can dress a princess. Maybe I would use a print, keeping it young, sophisticated and sexy. Just because you are a queen or princess it doesn't mean you can't be sexy."

    Right, in the world of Cavalli all of those things are true. But in the world of Cavalli it's like totally NBD to go out the house for brunch sporting a leopard chiffon evening gown with slits up to both thighs, Swarovski crystals on the neckline, and a fringed headscarf. In the real world, a princess wearing Roberto Cavalli is completely absurd — an ill-advised move, most definitely. But, since Cavalli has been so good to the Internet, the Internet can be good back to him now, can't it? So here's a rendering of what Kate Middleton would look like if she wore Cavalli.

    "This is definitely cooler for summer than pastel suiting, but I just don't know, guys."

    "This is definitely cooler for summer than pastel suiting, but I just don't know, guys."


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    Fifteen years ago, Sex and the City unleashed the mighty whirlwind of materialism and mismatching that was Carrie Bradshaw. A great many of her outfits were divine, but these were just plain absurd.

    The look that caused a worldwide pearl shortage.

    The look that caused a worldwide pearl shortage.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    The hospital scrubs she cinched with what was either a belt from a leftover Halloween genie costume or a gold mesh fanny pack.

    The hospital scrubs she cinched with what was either a belt from a leftover Halloween genie costume or a gold mesh fanny pack.

    Either is highly probable.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    The random "it's like my ribcage is wearing a necklace" look.

    The random "it's like my ribcage is wearing a necklace" look.

    Paired with a shirt she stole from one of Charlotte's daughters.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    The clothes she borrowed from Stanford and Big.

    The clothes she borrowed from Stanford and Big.

    You know Sanford would never pair this with a big black tie. He has better sense of colors than that.

    Source: Tumblr.com


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    Bikinis didn’t just scare the hosts of this year’s Miss World competition — they’ve been freaking people out all over the world for ages. It’s time that stops.

    Is there a more feared item of clothing than the bikini?

    Think about it: Every year, millions of women fear two-piece swimsuits before they even try them on in the confines of badly lit department store changing rooms. Whatever body confidence they managed to work up for that very moment dissipates as the suits seem to say: "You? Bikini body ready? AHAHAH!" The media teaches fear too: If women ever felt "bikini body ready," whatever that means, they probably wouldn't buy anywhere near the millions of magazines offering extreme pilates routines and stupid diet advice (does anyone ever just eat half a banana?) to get them there.

    (I once asked a friend who works at a celebrity gossip magazine why Jessica Alba was popular. This editor replied, "Well, she's got a great bikini body.")

    That fear is there constantly: Look good in this bikini — or else.

    And if a woman has the temerity to be confident in a bikini, it doesn't matter. The world still fears them. Bikinis freaked out Miss World host nation Indonesia enough that the pageant organizers decided to have competitors don "one-piece beachwear" including traditional Balinese sarongs, instead of the two pieces the competition is known for, with the goal of pleasing Muslim religious groups (who still want the pageant banned). Over in Mumbai, officials recently passed a proposal to ban the display of mannequins wearing bikinis in attempt to quell the region's highly publicized recent string of sexual assaults. The UK's Advertising Standards Authority just banned a commercial for an internet hosting provider Dreamscape Networks starring Pamela Anderson and another buxom actress wearing gold bikinis and writhing in foam. (In that case, the agency called it "degrading to women.")

    Things aren't necessarily simpler in the U.S. Young women were recently banished from sunbathing on the lawn of a New York City apartment building where kids play. The head of the tenants association for the building even told Yahoo she thought that all two-piece bathing suits should be banned, and, "The sunbathing is tasteless, it's not very classy, and it doesn't belong in a mixed residential development." And the main thing standing between Beyonce and her feminist stripes seems to be the bikini-sized costumes she wears on stage.

    As much as women have united to decry slut-shaming, the world remains as fearful of their bodies as it is enraptured by them. Jennifer Lopez is slammed for dancing on television wearing a leotard over what are essentially flesh-colored leggings, while Kate Upton's breasts become a celebrated viral news story just about every week. We cheer Pamela Anderson's incredible body, as seen in what I guess you'd call two-piece swimwear in Brazilian Vogue, and marvel at Gisele's post-baby bikini body on the cover of that very magazine. At the same time, many viewers felt disgusted by female performers wearing tight, sheer clothes in the recent Chime for Change concert in London, and the Huffington Post found it "stressful" wondering how Gwyneth Paltrow wore underwear under her infamous gown with the sheer sides.

    And feminists may hate beauty pageants, but ultimately the Miss World bikini ban has been deemed "no victory" for them.

    What some deem a correction of demeaning attire is just slut-shaming to others. And what seems empowering to Rihanna seems woefully submissive to many of her fans. But the world has no reason to fear bikinis or other skimpy clothes these days any more than it does lazy sunbathers on a public lawn.

    The real danger is the insistence that female power comes from one style of dress or the other. Empowerment takes many different forms. Tilda Swinton might feel like her most empowered self in a pair of pajamas, while Beyonce might feel like her most empowered self in a pair of leather hot pants and a bra top. The bikini backlash refutes that very notion — it's a symbol of the double standards feminism has hardly erased.

    We're not really protecting anyone by encouraging a culture of fear surrounding the bikini. It's hard enough being afraid of the way you look in a dressing room mirror. Women certainly can't please everyone, and it's time to stop making them feel like they have to.


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    She hopes this book also becomes a movie.

    Lauren Weisberger on set with Kathy Lee and Hoda.

    In 2004 Lauren Weisberger's debut novel The Devil Wears Prada became a phenomenon. Now, almost ten years later, she's putting out a sequel, Revenge Wears Prada, in which Miranda Priestly comes back to torment Andy Sachs some more. Weisberger spoke to BuzzFeed Fashion about the sequel — and whether or not she's touched base with her former boss Anna Wintour over the last decade.

    BuzzFeed Fashion: Revenge Wears Prada takes place ten years after the first book left off. Why did you start there?
    Lauren Weisberger: I really wanted to write the sequel for a long time. I just thought so much happens in your life in a decade and I was so curious to check back in with Andy.

    And the book opens with her marrying a male socialite named Max.
    Part of that was: Andy's growing up, too. Part of Max's appeal would have been very unappealing for the 22-year-old Andy. She would have seen the family and the money and the prestige and playboy aspects [of his life], and she would have writen him off and that would have been a naive 22-year-old thing to do. She was capable of seeing beyond all that and seeing he was a really great guy.

    In this book, she's running a high fashion print bridal magazine called The Plunge. It seems, in a way, surprisingly close to Runway.
    I kind of gave Andy what I was thinking would be a dream job for me. Her job has the fashion and the glamour aspect, but the best aspect of it was that she gets to cover celebrity weddings in these far-flung exotic locations. I felt like our Andy is a little bit more of a traditionalist, and she loves working at a magazine — maybe not so much Runway, but she wanted to stay in the publishing world in the original way.

    Do you travel a lot?
    I used to. I have two very small babies now so I don't get out very much. I'm on the road right now, promoting the book.

    How much do your personal experiences inform the book?
    It informs them quite a bit. Andy's and my career paths haven't necessarily followed the same direction, although I've always loved writing. I think New York plays a big part in it — I love the city, Andy loves the city. As a writer, I think you're always taking experiences from your own life.

    How into fashion are you?
    Not very. I love shopping, I love buying new things like any woman does, but not in terms of high fashion. That's not to say my characters aren't into it — that's definitely a feature of the book, though less so than the first one. But personally as an author, it's not something that I follow very closely.

    It's interesting to hear you say that because the characters' outfits are described in a very savvy way — you drop "Celine" and all the other "right" labels in just the right places.
    I guess that comes more from being a consumer of pop culture, not necessarily following the ins and outs of the fashion magazines. I'm a big tabloid and gossip magazine reader.

    Have you interacted with Anna Wintour since the first book came out?
    Nope.

    Will Revenge Wears Prada become a movie?
    I don't know, we'll have to wait and see. I would abolutely love that. I loved so much what they did with the first one.

    Having started out in magazines, did you ever foresee your career leading you to this point?
    I never even thought the first book was ever going to be a book, so when they published it and it became a phenomenon, it was a dream come true. And the best part of it is, it let me continue writing books, and I'm so, so grateful for that opportunity.

    Most first-time fiction authors have to write the whole novel before they can sell it. I understand The Devil Wears Prada sold on a half manuscript?
    Yes, that is true. It was super-exciting — a really lucky compliment.

    When you wrote the first book, were you afraid of how it would affect your career?
    No. I wrote a book that was meant to entertain people, and hopefully make people laugh —something you pick up and read on the beach. So that didn't really factor in for me. I kind of hoped it would help my career — it wasn't a fear thing. I was just happy that they published it! I thought four people would read it and they would all be in my family.

    Do you hear a lot from people who are assisting really scary, mean people?
    Yeah. When I'm out on tour, the best part of the whole process is when I actually get to meet the readers, and they have stories about working as assistants and I think that's what resonated with the first book — it's more of a universal experience than you might think.

    What advice do you give them?
    I tell them that it's a short amount of time, and it goes quickly, and there's a lot to learn and then it's over. And after that, it's also really important to remember you can be successful in the field of your choosing and also be a nice person. You don't have to be terrible, you don't have to be mean, you don't have to be condescending or make other people feel badly about themselves. I really think it's possible to be nice.

    Why do you think the fashion and even media industries breed these really strong personalities?
    I wouldn't say that it's really indicative of the fashion or media industries. In New York City, there's every industry you can find, and I think you find those personalities in all of them. People say the same of men and women, and I think it's more of a personality thing than a gender thing. That said, I feel really lucky that I haven't had to deal with office politics in a while.


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    The law, which would give fashion models working in New York the same protections as all other child performers, would discourage designers from hiring any models under the age of 18 — and could completely change the face of fashion.

    Senators Klein and Savino speaking at Lincoln Center in New York on Sunday.

    Via: Courtesy Photo

    When model Coco Rocha shoots an ad campaign, it's often split into two parts — print photographs and video. If a performer under the age of 18 is on set, she sees a drastic difference from one shoot to the next. "When we're doing a commercial, the crew changes completely," she said. "There is a nurse, there is a tutor" — a whole team assembles to watch over that adolescent performer, as mandated by New York state law.

    That team of caretakers doesn't have to show up for the print modeling part of the job because New York currently fails to provide print and runway models with the same protections as other child entertainers, like actors, musicians, or dancers. But new legislation proposed by Senate Co-Leader Jeff Klein and State Senate Labor Committee Chairwoman Diane Savino, seeks to close the loophole that excludes print and runway models from the same protections as all other child performers. The legislation — which could pass as soon as this week — was created with the help of the Model Alliance, a non-union organization that fights for fashion model rights, of which Rocha is a vocal and highly visible member. (Models work as independent contractors, and are therefore unable to unionize according to federal antitrust law.) Expanding the definition of child performers to include print and runway models would require young models to have chaperones on set, ensure a portion of their earnings goes into a financial trust, and ensure they don't miss too much school for work.

    If passed, the law could have a dramatic impact on an industry that regularly employs young women under the age of 18 for fashion shows, ad campaigns, and magazine shoots. By making it much more difficult to employ 16- or 17-year-old girls to model (most male models start their careers a little older, around 18 or 19), the controversially very young, very thin look the industry has become known for could finally start to change, to say nothing of the exploitation these young women regularly face.

    The abuses of child models in New York and the need for this kind of law are detailed in a report by the Independent Democratic Conference. The report also seeks to explain why fashion models have not been protected the way other child performers are for so long. "Society scoffs at labor complaints due to the attractive appearance of the models themselves, their 'assumed' large salaries, and the glamorous lifestyle they lead," the report states. "The Model Alliance works to dispel such notions. According to them, the average model makes about $32,000 annually, with a career that lasts only five years." The report includes the results of a survey conducted by the Model Alliance, in which 86% of respondents said they were asked to pose nude without prior notice and nearly 30% of respondents said they had experienced "inappropriate touching" on the job.

    The Department of Labor's rules for child performers only protect "models appearing in television broadcast or program" — which is why photo and video shoots are so different. New York already has laws that limit work hours for young models and require them to obtain work permits, but they currently fall under the Department of Education's purview rather the Department of Labor's, and therefore go widely unenforced.

    A majority of states, including Alaska, Alabama, Louisiana, and Iowa, already have stronger protections for child models than New York — which is bizarre considering New York's fashion industry employed 165,000 people and brought in $55 billion in sales in 2011, according to the IDC report. This makes New York "kind of like the Wild Wild West" in terms of child model regulations, Rocha said.

    Sara Ziff, a former model and founder and director of the Model Alliance, said this is the first piece of legislation born directly from the organization's advocacy work. Klein and Savino approached the Model Alliance about the bill after noticing its online petition asking New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and other state officials to give child models the same protections as other child performers.

    In September, Ziff testified at a hearing on new proposed regulations for child performers in New York, noting that print and runway models weren't included in the regulations governing the employment of child performers. "Which is strange because virtually every other kind of child performer working in New York was covered," Ziff said.

    "They basically told me this was out of the Department of Labor's jurisdiction, because the DOL does not cover fashion models," she added. "I basically argued that fashion models should be included. That's what we are doing now. It just took nine months to get there."

    Many models start their careers at the age of 13, 14, or 15, Ziff said, and routinely work very long hours without chaperones or tutors on set. Thanks to pressures from the Council of Fashion Designers of America and Vogue, more and more models start at age 16. Yet, that's still a very young age to be tasked with figuring out how to manage one's own finances without the help of a trustworthy adult. It's also quite young to handle pressure from agents to drop out of high school, or to figure out how to respond to unwanted sexual advances from older male photographers, or to deal with last-minute requests to pose nude or scantily clad when it wasn't previously specified in a job's description.

    Ziff thinks the proposed legislation "would protect kids who are not just working models, but all of these young women who come here with stars in their eyes, who are willing to do almost anything for a chance at success, whether that means dropping out of high school or giving into sexual demands from photographers."

    She thinks the law would discourage employers from working with minors as frequently as they do now, and "if it has the sort of indirect effect of skewing the age a little older to, say, that 18-year-old girl instead of that 15-year-old girl, I don't think that would be such a terrible thing," Ziff said. For instance, you'd see fewer girls getting pushed out of the business once puberty alters their figures.

    Susan Scafidi, the director of Fordham's Fashion Law Institute, expects the bill to pass quickly: "It's a child protection bill — no one votes against that." She also suggests designers start thinking now about how this law will affect their New York Fashion Week shows in September. A lot of casting decisions for those shows are made last-minute. But under the new legislation, designers would have to notify the Department of Labor days in advance of any minors they'd want to hire. That means no more adding in a 17-year-old to the lineup the night before a show walks.

    While the Department of Education hasn't enforced the laws governing child models already on the books, Scafidi cautions anyone considering hiring child models not to expect the same attitude from the Department of Labor. "They can send people to check [working conditions at fashion shows], they can contact individuals who have work permits and ask about their hours, they can contact individuals who have applied for certificates and ask to see their paperwork," Scafidi explained. "The rules are pretty strict. If the Department of Labor contacts you and says, 'I want to see all the permits of models who are under 18 this season,' you have to come up with them." Designers who pay models in "trade" (meaning designer clothing) instead of cash for runway work are not exempt from the law since goods count as a form of payment according to the IRS.

    Scafidi and Ziff both noted that the law still allows for artistic expression — should a designer or fashion editor feel it essential to hire a 17-year-old girl, they can. They'll just have to worry about a lot more paperwork, and, if they plan to send a model on a weeklong shoot somewhere far-flung, sending a chaperone and tutor along as well.

    Rocha and Ziff say the response to the bill has been positive so far, but "I don't think anyone would want to come out and say they're against it, because who is against the rights of a child?" Rocha noted.

    Ziff said she'd spoken with several modeling agency heads who have "been supportive behind the scenes," though they didn't appear at the press conference the Model Alliance and lawmakers held Sunday afternoon in New York to promote the bill. "I think for them, it's better for their business if they have models who are mature enough to deal with the adult pressures of the industry," Ziff said. She wasn't sure of how designers are feeling about the law but noted that other entertainment industries — Broadway, television, film, etc. — haven't been hurt by child labor laws, and she can't see them hurting the fashion industry, either.

    In a statement of support for the bill, Tyra Banks said, "I look forward to seeing young models have rights my generation did not." As decades of subpar working conditions have showed, legislation is probably the most effective way to grant models those rights.


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    Replete with eating disorders, backstabbing, and cat drawings. Here’s how to make the most of your summer lounging, including suggested cocktail pairings.

    The Vogue Factor by Kirstie Clements

    The Vogue Factor by Kirstie Clements

    This isn't out til July 1, but most definitely worth a pre-order. Clements, an ex-Vogue Australia editor, was fired after a 13-year tenure at the magazine, and therefore has no need to spare any gruesome details about the disturbing reality of fashion. "The only way [models] can get that thin is to stop eating. They eat tissue paper to stave off the hunger pangs – literally ball it up and eat it," she writes. She also recalls asking one model how she was getting along with her roommate. The model replied, "Fine," adding, "She’s a fit model so she is mostly in hospital on a drip."

    Suggested cocktail pairing: mudslide, to make up for all the calories those poor models don't get to enjoy.

    Source: barnesandnoble.com

    Alek: My Life From Sudanese Refugee to International Supermodel by Alek Wek

    Alek: My Life From Sudanese Refugee to International Supermodel by Alek Wek

    Model Alek Wek writes about how her family fled Sudan in the middle of a civil war, ended up in London, got discovered on the street one day, and then went on to become the face of Coach, Michael Kors, Nars, and lots of other major brands.

    One Amazon reviewer says, "I'm not a fan of reading. I really only picked up Alek Wek's book because she came to a book singing at my school... I sat the book down for several months, but, when I did pick it up over the Christmas break it gripped me."

    Suggested cocktail pairing: virgin Diet Coke — sobering like Wek's story.

    Source: blogs.kcls.org

    Revenge Wears Prada: The Devil Returns by Lauren Weisberger

    Revenge Wears Prada: The Devil Returns by Lauren Weisberger

    The much anticipated sequel to this generation's defining book about the hellish weirdness of a fashion career, Revenge Wears Prada checks in with Anne Hathaway Andy Sachs ten years after ditching Miranda Priestly. She's running a high-end bridal magazine called The Plunge, marrying a male socialite, and dealing with Priestly's grand re-entrance into her life — which occurs on a yacht during a party for a yacht magazine. What else could chick lit desire? Nothing.

    Suggested cocktail pairing: margarita, because they appear more than once in the book and they sound so good every time.

    Source: google.com

    The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

    The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

    If you haven't read the original or just haven't read it since it came out a decade ago, pick it up again! It goes by so fast you can read the whole thing in the time it takes to get a tan, anyway.

    Suggested cocktail pairing: straight scotch. What would you want at the end of a day Miranda Priestly spent torturing you?

    Source: geekerydo.blogspot.com


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    It’s Kardashian tight but breathable thanks to all the shirts stopping well above the belly button.

    Here's a first look at the line Nicki Minaj "designed" for KMart.

    Here's a first look at the line Nicki Minaj "designed" for KMart.

    Designed, in the celebrity sense of the word, tends to means she put her name on it and got videotaped tugging at the clothes to make it look like she actually DID design them. It's the same thing Rihanna did for River Island, you know?

    Here's a diorama that illustrates what the line will look like in KMart stores.

    Here's a diorama that illustrates what the line will look like in KMart stores.

    So basically, look for the neon clashing with the red KMart signage and you've found these clothes.

    "There are some dresses that I'm obsessing over already," Nicki says.

    "There are some dresses that I'm obsessing over already," Nicki says.


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    Ridiculously taut and MILF-y, obviously.

    First, Gisele took to social media to flaunt her new lingerie collection.

    First, Gisele took to social media to flaunt her new lingerie collection.

    It's like Brazil's Victoria's Secret. But maybe less, well, tacky.

    Source: facebook.com

    You'd do the same thing if you looked like this a couple months after giving birth for the second time.

    You'd do the same thing if you looked like this a couple months after giving birth for the second time.

    Hopefully you would refrain from putting ties on the sides of the panties in your lingerie range, because you'd realize they would just lead to some really gnarly underwear lines. But you'd be forgiven for such an oversight because, if you looked like this, why would you ever wear real clothes?

    Source: huffingtonpost.com

    In this Brazilian Vogue editorial, released around the same time as the lingerie pix, Gisele basically only wears wide, stretchy resistance bands you find in some exercise classes.

    In this Brazilian Vogue editorial, released around the same time as the lingerie pix, Gisele basically only wears wide, stretchy resistance bands you find in some exercise classes.

    Source: facebook.com

    Along with splashing water.

    Along with splashing water.

    Source: models.com


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    The law will afford models under the age of 18 the same protections enjoyed by all child performers. So designers might want to start sorting out their paperwork now.

    Senators Klein and Savino speaking with models at Lincoln Center in New York on Sunday.

    On Wednesday, New York lawmakers voted unanimously to pass a law that recognizes models as child performers, affording them the same protections actors, dancers, and musicians under the age of 18 have had for ages.

    Proposed by Senate Co-Leader Jeff Klein and State Senate Labor Committee Chairwoman Diane Savino, the law adds "print and runway models" to the list of child performers protected by strict Department of Labor regulations. Under these laws, designers who hire print and runway models under the age of 18 will now have to put a portion of the model's earnings into a trust, and hire chaperones and tutors for the girls on set. (The law is expected to affect female models more than model models, who tend to start their careers a little older.)

    This is also a significant accomplishment for the Model Alliance, a non-union organization that works to improve working conditions for fashion models, which worked closely with lawmakers on the bill. Model Alliance Director Sara Ziff said this is the first piece of legislation the organization has introduced. And Model Alliance member and model Coco Rocha, who promoted the bill this week, is thrilled with the vote. "I could not be happier," she said. "If the Model Alliance never achieves anything else, this was monumental."

    The law will result in a lot more paperwork for fashion houses wanting to hire young models. They'll now have to apply for a certificate to work with print or runway models younger than 18 and keep careful records of all minors they work with should the Department of Labor check in to make sure they're following the rules.

    "I think it's a good law," Fordham Fashion Law Institute Director Susan Scafidi told BuzzFeed Fashion earlier this week. "It really means that a lot of fashion houses, a lot of designers are going to have to rethink their castings." Now they can't add a 17-year-old to a fashion show lineup the night before a show — if they want to hire 17-year-olds, they'll have to plan ahead and submit paperwork days in advance.

    Violations will result in fines — up to $1,000 for the first offense, and $2,000 to $3,000 for second and third offenses. That's not a lot for a big, wealthy fashion brand, but the publicity they'd get for violating child labor laws would be much more damaging.

    "Truly, I think the simplest and easiest response to this law is just hire 18-year-olds," Scafidi said.

    Read more: Proposed Child Model Law Stands To Have Dramatic Impact On The Fashion Industry


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    People who want lasting careers in fashion media won’t find it by simply inviting the world to ogle their clothes.

    The Blonde Salad wearing a fluffy blue hat front row at a New York Fashion Week show in February.

    When the fashion industry talks about "bloggers," they often mean personal style bloggers — people who post photos of themselves wearing clothes. Of course, "blogger" is a terribly inaccurate term, because it could describe just about any fashion critic, photographer, or journalist covering fashion. Just about everyone's work goes on something that could be considered a "blog" these days. Lots of journalists write for what you might call a blog, but would they most accurately be described as "bloggers"?

    I'd argue no — not anymore. Especially since a new kind of site is starting to dominate fashion media, and there's a lot more to them than just blogging — and certainly a lot more to them than personal style blogging. This new site is something between a blog and an online magazine. It's usually the brainchild of a founder who never got into blogging so that people could enthuse over how she looks wearing clothes. They are sites like Into the Gloss, Business of Fashion, and P.S. I Made This. They possess excellent design, routinely produce originally reported articles, and are gaining more and more access to the world's most important fashion people and events. More robust than blogs, they're helmed by talented, trained editors whom the term "blogger" doesn't seem to do justice. Their sites tend to possess fewer resources than those attached to big media companies, like Vogue.com. But no matter: Advertisers are signing up while these fledgling online magazines and newspapers solidify their status as the industry's must-reads. And they're quite comfortably removed from the personal style blogging phenomenon — a fad that finally seems to be on the way out.

    The industry became hyper-aware of personal style bloggers a few years ago, when they started sitting in the front rows of fashion week shows. This was, albeit in an industry often rocked by uproar over affronts outsiders would view as benign, a controversial and borderline shocking move. While internet media had been attending shows for several years, the prominent positioning of these "bloggers" unsettled dozens of writers, stylists, and fashion editors who had been plugging away at their own ladder-climbing for a decade or several, striving for a view of the Dolce & Gabbana show on par with Vogue editor Anna Wintour's. And here, some upstart stylish young things with cute faces, immaculate clothing collections, and a keen understanding of the internet and social media had breezed their way up to the front row in a just short time simply by posting to the internet, in an aesthetically pleasing and cohesive fashion, photos of themselves wearing things alongside the occasional snap of some food they might eat. So, what business did these twentysomething — and in some cases, teenage — bloggers have sitting so close to the runway, making the hard work of everyone behind them seem rather pointless?

    Well, they had two functions: One, they publicized these shows for sizable audiences of equally fashion-obsessed people. Two, they served as mini-celebrities, who would get photographed, tweeted about, pointed at, and whispered about the way a CW actress might.

    This job of being an internet fashion celebrity became very appealing, especially as bloggers started figuring out how to monetize their sites and, more importantly, themselves. They sell banner ads, sure, but those don't even comprise the bulk of some of the most successful fashion bloggers' incomes. Now bloggers like the Man Repeller collect fees just to wear things on their blogs. (Update: Sources told BuzzFeed Fashion that Man Repeller's Leandra Medine has asked for payment in exchange for wearing a brand's clothes on her site, but Medine denies this claim, saying she's never been paid to wear anything on her site.) They also get paid to host parties — something the fashion world is never short on. And they might get deals to write books or collaborate with brands on everything from lines of jewelry (see: Atlantic-Pacific) to fur bow ties (see: Bryanboy). As a result, at fashion week, there seems to be a mad rush to get attention any which way, and young people show up wearing anything that could possibly get them photographed and publicized online. A lot of these attention-seekers are trying to legitimize their own Blonde Salad ambitions.

    This shameless preening has a lot to do with why a lot of people in the industry — who quietly roll their eyes at personal style bloggers, disgusted by the medium's shameless narcissism — wouldn't miss them. But in the years following their emergence, a few things always kept that hushed disgust from quashing these blogs:

    1. Commerce. These bloggers have large audiences who buy the things they link to.
    2. Novelty. Fashion loves the new, the now, the next more than just about any industry. That's exactly what this generation of internet stars represents.
    3. The industry's confusion over how to make the most of the internet without anchoring to an already successful personality. Up until a couple years ago, fashion trade paper Women's Wear Daily would run articles that did nothing more than announce a major brand had decided to join Facebook. You can see (and yet, you can't) a brand's logic: Fashion bloggers seemed to have it all figured out already, so why not align with them?

    But brands are becoming digitally savvier. The novelty of the personal style blog has worn off. And the best, most successful personal style bloggers either don't even need their sites anymore or have expanded them to be about more than just their personal style.

    The smartest, most successful personal style bloggers use their online followings as launching pads for not just those kinds of partnerships, but also modeling and entertainment careers. Fashion Toast's Rumi Neely signed with Next modeling agency and became the face of Forever 21. Bryanboy is now a regular on America's Next Top Model. The Blonde Salad appears to have spokesmodel-esque partnerships with huge brands like Nike and Seven for All Mankind. These incredible successes are part of the reason the personal style blogging medium is simply not self-sustaining. A lot of the earliest successful personal style bloggers are visible enough that they don't seem to need much more than their widely followed Twitter feeds these days to stay visible. This is not necessarily bad for the bloggers, who probably don't want to blog forever. The smartest personal style bloggers think from the beginning about how to use their followings to launch lasting careers that transcend a single website. Should they want to leave their sites behind to pursue what might feel like more meaningful opportunities, they surely could. Fashion never shunned people who were famous in the industry for vaguely discernible reasons, so the earliest personal style bloggers could very well use their fame and following to continue careers as spokesmodels, brand consultants, stylists, etc.


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    Remember Riccardo Tisci, the guy who dressed Kim Kardashian up like a couch ? The verdict on his new collection is in : “*sigh* This is just awful. From the prints to the unflattering shapes. Just awful.”

    Resort or "cruise" (because every rich person still takes those still) collections come out between the major spring and fall fashion weeks. Most designers just release images of their new lines rather than holding a show, probably because the fuss of two shows a year is enough. Besides, it would just be cruel at this point to force everyone to put together a whole other set of street style outfits for resort shows. Anyway, Kanye West's favorite designer Riccardo Tisci, who makes those famous leather kilts and Kim Kardashian's couch costumes, just put out his resort collection, and commenters on the Fashion Spot — some of the most fashion-obsessed people on this earth, even more so than Kanye West — have taken a click through the Style.com slideshow and decided the clothes are "awful."

    Editors over at the Fashion Spot published a post summarizing the comments that would read as a nasty critique of the collection without the agreement of TFS editor Pilar Meier, who writes: "It seems as though tFS forum members are growing tired of Riccardo Tisci's celebrity and street style-centric collections and I can't blame them." Most people wouldn't dare trash an Important Label like Givenchy, but maybe now that Kouchdashian has come and (almost) gone it's less of a scary thing to do?

    Here are some comments from the forum on Givenchy's new resort collection along with some key looks from the line. (All comments sic.)

    "is this supposed to look more flattering with that background? well, it really does not...."

    "is this supposed to look more flattering with that background? well, it really does not...."

    Note the older man in the blue top looking straight at the camera as he runs into the side of the model.

    Via liberty33r1b

    Source: style.com

    "This collection is just so confusing. I feel like he just spitballed wads of paper onto a board filled with vaguely popular themes and patterns from his past couple collections and stuck them together with ABC gum and created this mess."

    "This collection is just so confusing. I feel like he just spitballed wads of paper onto a board filled with vaguely popular themes and patterns from his past couple collections and stuck them together with ABC gum and created this mess."

    Via Moofins

    Source: style.com

    "What is going on with those florals. Did he wants to make everybody looks like a pregnant Kim K or what."

    "What is going on with those florals. Did he wants to make everybody looks like a pregnant Kim K or what."

    This comment continues: "And what's going on with this guy seriously. All he's been doing is stop making haute couture and makes some bambi, virgin mary, rottweiler t-shirts instead."

    (For the record, I liked all those shirts — and not just because Kanye would have been naked without them — and I do miss his couture.)

    Via Fashiognosis

    Source: style.com


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    Miss USA 2012 Olivia Culpo has done everything from spinning class to yacht photo shoots. I hope you have your bandage dresses ready.

    A year ago, Miss Rhode Island Olivia Culpo won Miss USA. She was like, "OH MY GOD! ME!"

    A year ago, Miss Rhode Island Olivia Culpo won Miss USA. She was like, "OH MY GOD! ME!"

    Miss Maryland was like "ahaha... you :("

    Via: Isaac Brekken / Getty Images

    Then she was all, "This just can't be happening!"

    Then she was all, "This just can't be happening!"

    Either that or she was embarrassed about the fact that she'd have to go everywhere wearing a huge crown. But then again, probably not.

    Via: STEVE MARCUS / Reuters

    And so she embarked on a fabulous journey of being a beauty queen — that special kind of celebrity people refer to by title alone.

    And so she embarked on a fabulous journey of being a beauty queen — that special kind of celebrity people refer to by title alone.

    Writers will have to look up your name whenever they write about you but: THAT CROWN. #priorities

    Via: Isaac Brekken / Getty Images

    So when you're Miss USA, the first thing they do is give you a business card.

    So when you're Miss USA, the first thing they do is give you a business card.

    Oh, wait, just kidding — they'll photograph you holding someone else's business card when you do your first official visit someplace.

    Via: Jason Kempin / Getty Images


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    Let’s hear it for Dior, everybody!

    Maggie Gyllenhaal wore this to the premiere of White House Down in New York.

    Maggie Gyllenhaal wore this to the premiere of White House Down in New York.

    It looks deceivingly like fish scales on top with Fido's sweater throw on bottom, plus a scrunchie belt to tie them together. But, it's actually one of the finest pieces of fashion to emerge from a runway in recent memory.

    Via: Getty Images

    Here's how it looked on the Christian Dior runway in Paris. It was part of a collection that practically had critics fainting with joy.

    Here's how it looked on the Christian Dior runway in Paris. It was part of a collection that practically had critics fainting with joy.

    "People left the Dior show today on a high, or I had the feeling they did," wrote New York Times critic Cathy Horyn, continuing, "Was it that Raf Simons had once again changed people’s expectations about Dior and, by association, fashion?" Also, she "was particularly impressed with the many ways that Mr. Simons added a graphical dimension to the clothes — for instance... a tight bunch of frills at the waist."

    Here's a closer look at Maggie.

    Here's a closer look at Maggie.

    "Tight bunch of frills" is one way to describe it, sure.

    "Tight bunch of frills" is one way to describe it, sure.


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    The industry has always been proud, but now, they couldn’t be more so.


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    Before and after retouching!

    Jared Leto posed as a woman for the cover of Candy, a wonderful — and "the first transversal" — style magazine.

    Jared Leto posed as a woman for the cover of Candy , a wonderful — and "the first transversal" — style magazine.

    Jared shaved his eyebrows, so naturally it made sense to "draw them in" with text.

    Source: papermag.com

    He models all the hot trends, like colored fur.

    He models all the hot trends, like colored fur.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    Flirty prints.

    Flirty prints.

    Source: Tumblr.com

    A naughty trench.

    A naughty trench.

    Source: Tumblr.com


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    The response: “Now where’s the president’s Instagram? Lol.”

    Here's MObama's first Instagram, taken on her trip to Africa.

    Here's MObama's first Instagram, taken on her trip to Africa.

    As you can see everyone is *very* excited about this, except maybe the person who just wants to know where the POTUS' Instagram is. Sorry, but who cares about him when Michelle has arrived? Follow her!

    Source: instagram.com

    And here are more photos from her trip to Africa.

    And here are more photos from her trip to Africa.

    Here she is on Goree Island looking fab in some festive peach (but with these filters, who can tell?) pants.

    She also uploaded a video!

    She also uploaded a video!

    Of students performing a welcome ceremony for her in Dakar. Watch it on her feed.

    BTW, while she's cracked Instagram and Instagram video she/the people who do social media for her haven't tweeted since March. It's possible her Instagram foray will soon come to a heartbreaking halt so enjoy it while it lasts now.

    Here she is mingling with some young ladies at a middle school in Dakar.

    Here she is mingling with some young ladies at a middle school in Dakar.

    "'You all are role models for my daughters, which is why I brought them here today - so that they could be inspired by you just like I am.' -First Lady Michelle Obama at MLK Middle School in Dakar. #FLOTUSinAfrica"


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    Kate Upton has a great rack, sure, but she’s much more than that — she’s one of the most versatile models of our time, a true actrice before the camera. Here’s an in-depth look at her many moods.

    "You're sure he's fake, right? Because my legs are kind of open."

    "You're sure he's fake, right? Because my legs are kind of open."

    Source: models.com

    "You know I'd look better actually hula hooping."

    "You know I'd look better actually hula hooping."

    Source: models.com

    "Hurry because he's either about to attack the cat toy on this purse or my head."

    "Hurry because he's either about to attack the cat toy on this purse or my head."

    Source: models.com


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    The Bling Ring gave her the perfect opportunity to regain her mega-fame in the U.S. — and yet she’s been unable to seize it.

    Paris Hilton in Los Angeles on June 5.

    Via: JB Lacroix/WireImage / Getty Images

    A couple of weeks ago, writer Jo Piazza witnessed a swarm of about 20 paparazzi at L.A. restaurant The Ivy. This is a usual occurrence at the place, and Piazza figured it was just "a Kardashian sitting on the patio." She asked photographers who was there, and, to her dismay, they replied, "Paris Hilton."

    "I said, 'Does anyone care?'" Piazza recalled. "And they said, 'Well, we do now because of The Bling Ring.'"

    Until press for the movie picked up in earnest, Paris Hilton was merely a husk of her formerly huge persona — a relic of shameless Bush-era wealth who still enjoyed great fame overseas but was easily ignored in the U.S. Some cherished Hilton's lost grip on fame because it represented the faint hope that the mind-bogglingly vacuous and boring era of the Kardashians would also one day end. If she was going to come back in a big way, it wasn't going to be easy. But America loves a comeback story, and The Bling Ring gave Hilton the opportunity to re-emerge. Yet the flourishing renaissance Hilton could be enjoying right now just hasn't quite materialized.

    The Bling Ring was the perfect opportunity for Hilton to sneak her way back into the media. She saw that the artsy film could help her turn a corner, allow her to trade her party-girl persona for something more meaningful, and associate in a big way with Sofia Coppola — impossibly chic wearer of clothes, close friend to Marc Jacobs, and a talented woman many see as thoughtful, inspiring, and visionary. Coppola and the film offered Paris the chance she'd been waiting for to re-enter the spotlight. Indeed, her Q Scores — a measure of celebrities' appeal — will be updated for the first time since 2011 in August.

    Paris Hilton's shoe closet, as seen in The Bling Ring.

    To some degree, Hilton capitalized on this. She made a cameo in the film and let Coppola shoot in her home. She did TV interviews with Piers Morgan and David Letterman to promote the movie and herself. And she let Coppola photograph her at home for Elle magazine. Those photos display a newly demure side of the socialite: Hilton sits on her patio wearing a slouchy sweater and low-heeled Oscar de la Renta pumps, and sits upright in an armchair wearing a conservative, pale blue A-line Valentino dress. The spread is edgy without trying, possessing the same effortlessly cool air synonymous with Coppola and her films. Finally, Hilton appeared of-the-moment rather than like a ghoulish version of her old self. She looked like she'd grown up.

    Hilton's transition from New York It girl to bona fide celebrity began in 2000, after Nancy Jo Sales, author of the book on which The Bling Ring is based, wrote about her for Vanity Fair. At the time, "she was just this girl in nightclubs dancing on tables," Sales said. Before The Simple Life premiered in 2003, making her and Nicole Richie international stars, the sex tape came out. Hilton exploits, mostly revolving around her nighttime partying, saturated the media so much that Lloyd Grove banned her from his gossip column at the New York Daily News. Later, the Associated Press vowed not to write about her for a whole week. By the time the second season of reality competition show Paris Hilton's My New BFF came out in 2009, it was hard to get the American public to care about anything she did. Though she faded from the press after eight or nine years of utter Paris saturation, she had still made an enormous imprint on the culture of celebrity and reality television. Hilton made it possible to be famous for being famous.

    The now-32-year-old Hilton in those Elle photos looks like the kind of fallen star America would usher back to fame. Maybe she could join Bravo's Housewives — that's the kind of move that would make sense for a formerly super-famous socialite in her early thirties. But then you click over to her Twitter feed, and you start to think the image of Hilton on her patio wearing kitten heels is just a rouse. Here, you're faced with a magnified version of the old Paris Hilton. She'll tell all her followers to watch The Bling Ring trailer because she's in it. But in the next breath she's telling everyone to stop by her summer residency as a DJ at an Ibiza nightclub, or Instagramming photos of herself wearing a crown of daisies or light-up tutu at a rave.


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    They’re named “Winny Puhh.”

    The men's fashion shows are taking place in Paris right now. Let's take a moment to check in on what's happening on the runways.

    The men's fashion shows are taking place in Paris right now. Let's take a moment to check in on what's happening on the runways.

    Why, that must be the Rick Owens show!

    Via: PATRICK KOVARIK / Getty Images

    The band hanging from the ceiling is called Winny Puhh.

    Owens has quite a thing for this band. "Estonian is such an alien language that when it's shrieked at you by a guy in a wolf mask, it becomes major," he told Style.com.

    "Major" is one word for this, yes.

    "Major" is one word for this, yes.

    Via: Francois Mori / AP

    Let's not give Lady Gaga any ideas, now.

    Let's not give Lady Gaga any ideas, now.


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    Male models are some of the most beautiful and ridiculous people on the planet. If you’re not following a few of them on Twitter, you just shouldn’t even be on Twitter.

    1. Sebastian Sauvé

    1. Sebastian Sauvé

    He's known for his chiseled cheekbones and pillowy pout, but he's not nearly this serious IRL.

    He's probably the last person who needs a bag over his head.

    He's probably the last person who needs a bag over his head.

    But he's just silly like that.

    He has major sand-in-the-face game.

    He has major sand-in-the-face game.

    His posts get slightly awkward sometimes, but that's just because he brings the #realness.

    His posts get slightly awkward sometimes, but that's just because he brings the #realness.

    Delightful.


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