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BuzzFeed, Find Your New Favorite Thing

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    Also: Justin Timberlake, who clearly has a really bad hair mousse addiction.

    I won't waste your time — I know 60% of you probably just clicked into this post to see Irina Shayk's boobs.

    I won't waste your time — I know 60% of you probably just clicked into this post to see Irina Shayk's boobs.

    Via: ALBERTO PIZZOLI / Getty Images

    So let's get right to it.

    So let's get right to it.

    Via: ALBERTO PIZZOLI / Getty Images

    She wants you to see them, too!

    She wants you to see them, too!

    Via: ALBERTO PIZZOLI / Getty Images

    Zachary Quinto was like, "The dress is almost there from a fashion perspective but it has that painted-on look that cheapens things."

    Zachary Quinto was like, "The dress is almost there from a fashion perspective but it has that painted-on look that cheapens things."

    You know thats what he was thinking — he's wearing a patterned bowtie.

    Via: ALBERTO PIZZOLI / Getty Images


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    The High Commissioner for Human Rights urged Japan to make sexual harassment illegal in the workplace after hearing the case of Rina Bovrisse, who sued Prada for discriminating against female employees who were “old, fat, ugly.”

    Rina Bovrisse at the UN in April.

    Via: Courtesy of Rina Bovrisse.

    The UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has urged Japan to adopt legislation that would make sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace illegal. The recommendation comes in response to Rina Bovrisse's nearly four-year-long legal battle with Prada Japan, her former employer, who she sued in Tokyo court for sexual harassment and discrimination.

    Bovrisse sued the label after Prada Japan CEO David Sesia ordered the demotion or transfer of female employees he found "old, fat, ugly, disgusting, or did not have the Prada look." Tokyo court ruled that although Prada management did engage in the discrimination Bovrisse and her coworkers described, it was acceptable behavior for a fashion house whose employees should be able to take it. So Bovrisse brought her case to the UN in April as the first fashion case ever to be heard by that commission.

    "Anyone who buys from the Prada and Miu Miu brands are supporting a culture of discrimination and power harassment," Bovrisse said in her testimony before the commission. "With the power of social networking, powerful companies can no longer hide their dirty secrets. I am taking a stand, but I have gathered strength from the support I get from around the world." She added, "In reality, The Devil Wears Prada is a soft version of the highly competitive world of luxury fashion."

    Calling herself a "victim of harassment by the Prada Group," Bovrisse described how, after she complained about the harassment to Prada COO Sebastian Suhl and the human resources office in Milan, she was let go for "bringing negative energy to the company" and accused of being mentally ill. She said the brand provided a resignation letter for her to sign and noted that Prada Japan CEO David Sesia is quoted in court documents as saying, "One must watch pornographic films in order to understand how women think."

    The UN's ruling, which was just released, reads:

    The Committee urges the State party to introduce in its legislation an offence of sexual harassment, in particular in the workplace, which carries sanctions proportionate to the severity of the offence. The Committee also recommends that the State party ensure that victims can lodge complaints without fear of retaliation. The Committee recommends that the State party continue to raise the public awareness against sexual harassment.

    In an email to BuzzFeed Fashion, Bovrisse described the ruling as "very positive," adding, "I hope Miuccia Prada realizes we live in 2013, that the power of social networking and individual voice can [bring attention to] any brands for doing the wrong thing... I am a happier person now not wearing brands to identify myself."

    Prada has countersued Bovrisse for $780,000 for damaging its image. At the time of this writing, a Change.org petition urging Prada to drop the lawsuit has garnered 203,000 signatures.


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    She’s on the cover of Ms. to the disgust of many — but really, the magazine couldn’t have found a better cover model.

    Source: facebook.com

    Beyoncé covers Ms. magazine under the headline "Beyoncé's Fierce Feminism." The internet's knee-jerk reaction — which has gotten more attention in the media than the actual story itself has — has been to rudely refute, or at least to politely question, Beyoncé's feminist status.

    A heated debate on the merits of Beyoncé's breed of feminism has ensued on the magazine's Facebook page. Many oppose labeling her a feminist on the cover of Ms.:


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    In other news, the VS casting director is now going by “Captain Obvious.”

    After the Victoria's Secret's fashion show casting director said she "would never use" Kate Upton in the show, here she is on the back cover of a new Victoria's Secret catalog.

    After the Victoria's Secret's fashion show casting director said she "would never use" Kate Upton in the show, here she is on the back cover of a new Victoria's Secret catalog.

    That casting director, Sophia Neophitou, called Upton's look "too obvious," whatever that means. Well, maybe her recent Vogue cover has caused the VS casting lords to rethink their model lineup because here's Upton in all her obviousness not just in the catalog but on the back cover no less. Who's Captain Obvious now, eh, VS?

    Source: imgbox.com  /  via: forums.thefashionspot.com

    Despite that slam, Upton has previously appeared in the catalog. Here she is modeling PJs in 2011.

    Despite that slam, Upton has previously appeared in the catalog. Here she is modeling PJs in 2011.

    Casting for the catalog and fashion show are seen as two very different things to the fashion community. There's a lot of cross-over but it's not a fully symbiotic relationship.

    Source: img2.imagetitan.com

    When these photos were taken she had to be around 18 or 19.

    When these photos were taken she had to be around 18 or 19.

    This was before she became a big deal via Sports Illustrated's swimsuit issue, her first cover for which dropped in 2012.

    Source: img2.imagetitan.com

    The VS fashion show casting director can talk as much smack as she wants, but Upton clearly had the "just casually regarding the hem of this animal print" pose down pat.

    The VS fashion show casting director can talk as much smack as she wants, but Upton clearly had the "just casually regarding the hem of this animal print" pose down pat.

    Source: img2.imagetitan.com


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    There’s really only one person who could pull off these gold pajamas.

    Tilda Swinton.

    Tilda Swinton.

    Via: Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

    Notably the rare female celebrity who isn't afraid to shave the sides of her head.

    Notably the rare female celebrity who isn't afraid to shave the sides of her head.

    No cop-outs with those sissy tiny French braids.

    Via: Ian Gavan / Getty Images

    Any questions?

    Any questions?

    Via: Ian Gavan / Getty Images


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    Because handbags make the world go round. Just like fur boxing gloves!

    The program for the CFDA Awards — the Oscars of fashion — is called the CFDA Journal. Each year the Journal hires a top photographer to capture the nominees and their work, and publishes the material on extremely luxurious cardboard-like paper stock which is then bound into something like a cross between a book and a magazine that puts Broadway Playbills and all your friends' wedding stationary combined to astounding shame. Here, BuzzFeed Fashion has an exclusive first look at the photographs of the nominees for best accessory design, all shot by Peter Lindbergh in the typically serious and seemingly emotionless mood that defines fashion warriors of this caliber. Enjoy!

    Alexander Wang

    Alexander Wang

    Known for: real fur boxing gloves; real fur heels; the "rocco" bag that has lots of little metal feet all over the bottom; ear cuffs that could cut you.

    Meet Wang!

    Meet Wang!

    Also known for: seductive, well-conditioned hair.

    Phillip Lim

    Phillip Lim

    Known for: the double zippered "pashli" purse; the "31-hour" handbag (which some consider to be the perfect handbag); shoes that you can actually walk in.


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    From the new Saint Laurent campaign. Is the brand geling for you yet?

    Cara's back, pensive.

    Cara's back, pensive.

    Source: models.com

    Cara wondering how on earth she forgot to wear pants.

    Cara wondering how on earth she forgot to wear pants.

    Source: models.com

    Cara wishing her bedazzled pantyhose weren't so itchy.

    Cara wishing her bedazzled pantyhose weren't so itchy.

    Source: models.com

    Cara complaining to a friend on her iPhone about wearing a fur in the hot sun.

    Cara complaining to a friend on her iPhone about wearing a fur in the hot sun.

    Source: models.com


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    Is the explosion of underwear as clothing at summer festivals a by-product of a self-obsessed, social media–addicted generation? Or a sign that these wildly popular events have become some of the safest places for no-holds-barred self-expression?

    Coachella 2012.

    Source: gavon

    Jim Tremayne has been going to raves for more than two decades. It's part of his job as the editor of the country's top electronic dance music (EDM) magazine, DJ Times, but his work can get a bit uncomfortable.

    "I feel like the creepy uncle sometimes when I'm working a show," said Tremayne, who often finds himself at concerts before "a gaggle of girls — I don't know, they're 19 years old or something, and they're wearing very little." Think: underwear. At most, "they might have some sort of fluffy legwear going on."

    EDM festivals — or raves — have become events welcoming increasing nakedness as they've attained mainstream popularity. Women and men now routinely strip down to flashy and alarmingly skimpy outfits to attend festivals like Coachella, Electric Daisy, and Electric Zoo — a dramatic shift from how the rave scene began. "In the '90s there was sort of an asexual vibe to raverwear," Tremayne said. "The big, baggy stuff didn't really accentuate any hips or boobs or anything, whereas now it's so in your face."

    EDM developed a cult following in the '80s. Since the music wasn't played on the radio, fans had to seek it out — and not just by going to record shops, but by using physical maps to navigate themselves to raves, where they could hear the music live in hidden locations that only the most dedicated fans would bother discovering. And they dressed more like they were going camping than to a Vegas pool party — flannels and enormous pants and polo shirts were cool. Baggy was THE rave look. But now that the genre has exploded in popularity, that's all changed. Spending the days or weeks leading up to EDM festivals bedazzling bras and DIY-ing bikini bottoms if you're a woman, or simply picking up a Speedo and oversized flag to wear as a cape if you're a man, is a normal part of the festival experience for millennials.

    The result: Good luck finding anyone who showed up to the Calvin Harris set wearing Dad's flannel.

    In the '90s, rave culture was "proudly and happily underground," Tremayne said. But that's all changed thanks to social media. At shows, "I'll notice all people are doing are taking pictures or Instagramming crazy things, and it's not necessarily about the music — it's about, 'Look at me, I'm justifying my existence by putting up my Facebook status,'" he continued. "It's about, 'Look at me and my friends going out, look how much fun we're having, look at what we're wearing, look at that crazy guy over there.'" Plugging EDM into social media turned its festivals into the biggest, most shareable party of our time — and kids are dressing to get noticed in the millions of bits of EDM festival content that positively floods social networks.

    L.A.-based DJ Reid Speed frequently sees people at EDM shows wearing nipple tape in place of tops, underwear in place of clothes, and candy in place accessories you can't eat. "It's like the prosti-tot trend has taken over," she said. "Even the guys, if they're wearing a shirt — halfway through the party they're not wearing it anymore."

    "Culture has just become extremely sexually charged in a way that, before the internet, wasn't a thing," she continued. "While you wanna believe that women are just becoming empowered and feel comfortable with their bodies, I'm not sure that's what it's all about." (She also acknowledged that men are equal opportunists when it comes to near nudity at these things.)

    Reid noticed a shift in rave fashion around 2004 or 2005, when concert promoters started advertising "pajama" or "lingerie" parties to lure people to raves, which drew a lot of kids out in their underwear. At the time, raves were experiencing a bit of a lull, but the pajama parties really took off. "They were having them in Seattle and Denver and places that were cold, and you're like, wait — it's cold!" recalled Reid. "I can understand in Southern California why people would want to take their clothes off, but when you see 14-year-old girls shivering in a snowstorm in Denver, you're like, this is just sad."

    Reid also suspects the heavily male DJ scene — and the vast majority of DJs at every major festival are men — also exerts some influence over the fashion (or lack thereof) at raves now. Acts like Borgore, whose tracks include "Act Like a Ho" and "Nympho," are known for sexually charged music. "He's really funny. It's like an act, but his act is to sell misogyny, and people love it. They eat it up. They go to his shows and hope they can have sex with him," Reid says. "If there were a lot more positive female role models, the culture would probably change, and you'd see the fashion change along with it because girls would be like, fuck that — I don't need to slut it up to get noticed at a party."

    Reid describes herself as "not a sexy female DJ — you're not going to see sexy bikini pictures on the internet." Yet she's felt pressure, like any female performer these days, to sexualize her image. She even turned down repeated requests to pose for Playboy — a lucrative offer, but not one she regrets passing up. "I'm not going to tell girls [at concerts] they look stupid," she said. "It's just sad that girls don't care more about just trying look good for themselves — they're so wanting to be thought of as a desirable sex object by boys on drugs. If I can help change that mind-set, that would be awesome."

    Billboard contributor Kerri Mason, who specializes in EDM, sees skimpy raver fashion as merely another facet of sexualized images of young female celebrities that the world has simply become accustomed to. Since the late '90s, Britney Spears became a teen sex symbol, Paris Hilton came and went, and the likewise figure-flaunting Kardashians rose to astounding levels of popularity. The covered style of grunge also ended (though it's now chipping away at a runway comeback, it's not yet gaining significant traction on the streets). Skimpy clothing is simply normal for young, concertgoing girls.

    "I think when women...allow themselves to be more playful with how they dress, there's a backlash," said Mason, noting that the nearly naked look has been co-opted by men at these festivals too. "I was walking past guys at [Electric Daisy Carnival] in New York wearing no shirts, and I'm like, they must have worked out for months for this." The way she sees it: "All the dudes look like go-go boys from Splash."


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    Those bikini photos allegedly weren’t photoshopped, according to tabloid reports. But there’s no way that’s true, says an expert.

    Here's Beyoncé's new H&M campaign.

    Here's Beyoncé's new H&M campaign.

    Source: marieclaire.co.uk

    An "insider" told the British Sun that Beyoncé expressly forbade the altering of her images for the ads:

    "When Beyonce found out they had edited the way her body really looked, she hit the roof.

    "She's a true diva and was furious that she had been given such a snubbing. Her people refused to give the pictures the green light so H&M were forced to use the originals."

    H&M responded to the claims:

    An H&M spokesman admitted that there had been "discussions" about the photos — and confirmed the final published pictures were not doctored.

    He added: "As with all campaigns there are discussions on which images should be used. Both H&M and Beyonce are very happy with the final result."

    This story — which is sketchy due to its foundation in unnamed sources and publication in, well, The Sun — is a great press opportunity for both Beyoncé, who can claim to appear as a perfect specimen of unretouched humanity in the photos, and H&M, which can claim to have not retouched the campaign. So, feel good vibes for the everywoman's body confidence all around, basically. But is the claim that the photos were "not doctored" — whatever that means — true? "Bullshit," one expert retoucher told BuzzFeed Fashion.

    Looking at the above image, this retoucher explained: "No one has a perfect, wrinkle-free armpit like that. There isn't a wrinkle in her lips or the gloss picking up random highlights." Also, you'll notice her neck is perfectly devoid of creases or wrinkles, and a slight blurriness where natural under-eye bags would be.

    No one's armpits are naturally this smooth.

    No one's armpits are naturally this smooth.

    Source: models.com

    In this screen shot from a promotional video of Beyoncé's campaign, you can see that — lo! — even she has a crease where her shoulder meets her arm.

    In this screen shot from a promotional video of Beyoncé's campaign, you can see that — lo! — even she has a crease where her shoulder meets her arm.

    As perfect and inhuman as she is, even Beyoncé has glimmers of the arm wrinkles that affect the rest of us.


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    “We didn’t have to worry about malfuntions because basically her whole top is covered and she wears dance pants underneath the leotard.”

    Source: Tumblr.com

    Jennifer Lopez defended the black leotard she wore for her recent Britain's Got Talent performance, after viewers and the media made a dramatic fuss about it being too raunchy. "I think people are so much raunchier than I am. I feel like I'm so tame," she told a British radio station. The look — the red version of which became famous in her video for "Live It Up" — is by New York-based designers The Blonds, who are famous for creating fabulous, sparkly performance looks for female performers. David Blond, who designs the label with Phillipe Blond, jumped on the phone with BuzzFeed Fashion to explain why J. Lo's "raunchy" ensemble was actually quite conservative — and why he's actually kind of enjoying the uproar.

    BuzzFeed Fashion: Did you create this look specifically for J. Lo?
    David Blond: We had the idea [for that outfit] around three years ago. It's funny how things come around and eventually find their way to the right person. The idea of it was we just love the contrast, playing with silhouettes and volume in different places — having a slim body with very voluminous sleeves has this effect of having a cover up. It sort of goes back to that whole time when [performers] would have feathers and do reveals, and when she would wrap her arms around herself it was like another reveal.

    The black version she wore for Britain's Got Talent ended up being controversial.
    That's the point. We always enjoy when a piece starts conversation and gets people going. The whole point of what we do is entertain people and help them have fun and escape from the everyday. And I think the choreography had something to do with it.

    Right, people thought the crotch shots were too much.
    It's interesting to me because she did exaclty the same thing and the same choreography at the Billboard Awards, but she's only filmed from the front at the Billboards, so you only see her boots popping. But in Britain's Got Talent they did a shot of her from above so it really gave a full-on [view], which I think is fabulous. That's my favorite part of the choreography.

    For reference, here's that move on Britain's Got Talent.

    For reference, here's that move on Britain's Got Talent .

    And here it is at the Billboard Awards.

    And here it is at the Billboard Awards.

    Source: gifsforum.com


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    As the CEO of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, Steven Kolb meets with Diane Von Furstenberg in her bedroom and helps hook premier designers up with Kohl’s collaborations. And before this job, he wasn’t even interested in fashion.

    Via: Courtesy of CFDA.

    Steven Kolb is the chief executive officer of the Council of Fashion Designers of America. So what does he do, exactly? "I run it," he said. "I work for the board of directors, which Diane [Von Furstenberg] is the president of, but I'm managing the organization. I'm managing our finances, I'm managing our investments, I'm managing our staff, I'm taking the lead on big partnerships and relationships, I'm hiring people, I'm firing people, I'm engaging members in programs, committees activities — I'm doing all of that." Monday night in New York, the council puts on its annual award show honoring the U.S.'s top fashion design talent from the past year. Think of it as the Oscars of fashion. "At the end of the day, if the CFDA Awards is a failure, it's my fault," Kolb said. He spoke to BuzzFeed Fashion about keeping Jersey Shore out of the awards show; his colleague, friend, and CFDA president Diane Von Furstenberg; and just what exactly the mysterious-seeming CFDA does day to day.

    I think everyone's excited to see Hillary Clinton present the Founders Award to Oscar de la Renta. How did that come about?
    Steven Kolb: She's got a personal relationship with Oscar, and when the board decided to give Oscar the Founders Award she seemed like the natural person to ask. Diane [Von Furstenberg] works with Secretary Clinton a lot on Vital Voices, a charity they're both involved in. So she emailed Mrs. Clinton right away and she said schedule permitting, absolutely. So she'll be there wearing Oscar de la Renta.

    Over the past several years, Anderson Cooper, Jeremy Piven, and Ellen Barkin have hosted the awards. This year it's Andy Cohen. How do you select hosts?
    SK: Anderson was great, Seth was great, Andy's going to be great. There's a pattern — a lot of them are friends of Diane's, and we kind of just think of someone who's going to be funny and relevant at the moment. It's a little bit of a fashion outsider stepping into the fashion scene and their commentary about what they see and think about it all. It is a hard crowd — fashion people, in my experience, don't belly laugh out loud. Jokes more quietly register in their brain, and that's a tough thing.

    How much say do hosts have over their material?
    SK: It's an hour and 20 minute show. We really want to have a quick in-and-out show; people appreciate that. It always starts with the host's ideas, but there are things that are rejected. When Jersey Shore first came out, for one of the films [introducing a menswear nominee], the creative director wanted to do this whole spoof on Jersey Shore and The Situation and Pauly D, and we said, absolutely not — there will be no Jersey Shore at the CFDA Awards. And I'm from Jersey!

    There have been some other calls — we always do the beautiful Swarovski Awards opening package. We did a Swarovski film with Ryan McGinley and it was filmed at Woodstock and there was a little too much nudity. And that wasn't necessarily because the audience was so prudish about it, but just in terms of corporate use afterward. It was so beautifully shot and so beautifully done, though.

    Would the awards ever be broadcast on TV like the Oscars?
    SK: It used to be broadcast on TV, but it's a hard event to do for television because there's a lot of stop and go. And it's an industry event — an insider event — and that's something that I don't want to lose. The opportunity is really digital, which is why last year and this year we're showing the awards on Style.com the morning after. People are getting fashion access through websites and blogs. It just seems relevant and fresh and it allows us to keep the event pure.

    I feel like a lot of people are nostalgic for the days when, I don't know, Naomi Campbell went to the awards and danced on tables.
    SK: They're still irreverent. People still talk about who went to the bathroom too many times or who was ill-prepared or had a little bit too much to drink.

    Why are the awards important?
    SK: What some people forget or don't know is it's a fundraiser as much as it is an acknowledgment of the top talent from the past year. We're selling every ticket. At the end of the day I need to make money, because it's our biggest and only main fundraiser of the year. But our overall mission is to promote American fashion. As much as the Academy Awards doesn't like us to call it the Oscars of fashion, I mean, it is. It puts a spotlight on an industry that people sometimes see as mysterious.

    Diane von Furstenberg and Steven Kolb at the CFDA 2013 Awards nomination event in March in New York.

    Via: Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images

    And would you say it helps winners' careers?
    SK: The industry really pays attention to it. Again, comparing it to the Oscars, when you get nominated or you win an Oscar, you get better scripts. I think there's more work and more attention. Fashion is seasonal and moves so quickly, so winning a CFDA Award is only as good as the last two collections you won it for — and then get ready for September and start it all over again.

    Every time I go to a member or a designer's studio or office or home and they've won a CFDA Award, there it is — it's not like it's in a box somewhere. People are proud to get it. For a young designer to get the Swarovski award [for emerging talent], it does get them, at their next show, an increase in buyers and editors who attend.

    The awards are voted on by industry types. How are those people selected?
    SK: The way we come up with the nominees and honorees is the industry nominates who they think should win, and then they vote. That's fellow designers, retailers, editors, stylists, bloggers. Carine Roitfeld was talking to Diane once about not being a CFDA member — I said, she's not a member because she's not a designer. What she meant was, she considered herself a member of [the group that nominates and and votes] for the CFDA awards. We call that CFDA Fashion Awards Guild, and we worked really hard to expand that with a lot of national retailers, a lot of international editors. We want to make sure we get the true opinion of a really broad section of the industry.

    So it's not just American fashion people.
    SK: It's somebody that's actively working in the business, that's paying attention to seasonal collections. It's a little bit of an opinion on our part to what extent they're doing that, but it's really about people who follow fashion, who write about it, who really know the business of it. Some blogger in the Midwest who's capturing stuff from others, that's not really it.

    A lot of the winners and nominees repeat over and over. Is that concerning?
    SK: I think you have to look back at all the events from the '80s, and there were periods when designers dominated the CFDA Awards for a time. I think the nominees and the people being nominated are a reflection of what's happening in fashion at the time. There was a time when it was Ralph, Donna, and Calvin. They're great brands — they're ambassadors of American fashion. The Swarovski awards are pretty fresh every year. But there's no question when you look at women's wear that Marc, Proenza, and Alex dominate. And it's not Diane or me that decides, it's really this guild that makes this determination.

    Outside of the awards, a lot of people don't understand what the CFDA does. Is it designers getting together secretly and deciding they'll put us all in white next spring?
    SK: That question always surprises me because we're a trade organization. We come to work at the CFDA every day and say, "How can we make American fashion better known, bigger, more financially successful?"

    We're helping designers at every stage of their career. We're giving scholarships to design students, we're helping emerging designers who are just starting, we're helping the small business designers, and we're involving the big marquee names as well. And it's our job to provide them information on the industry — we hold regular professional development programs on issues that matter, like HR issues, social media, doing business in Asia. Topics that we're constantly updating. We've been very involved in Washington and lobbying for copyright protection. We're connecting MBA students to designers. We have our charitable initiatives as well, where we raise money for AIDS and breast cancer. And we're also putting business and deals in place — the whole Kohl's relationship that Derek and Narciso and Catherine Malandrino have done. Li & Fung, who's our partner [and works with Kohl's] actually came to us. So we're creating business opportunities for designers.

    Would you say it's essential for designers to do those collaborations now?
    SK: It really depends. I think a lot of designers would never do that because it's not right in terms of where they sit in terms of price point. I think it shows the democratization of fashion that's really been evident the last eight to ten years. It shows the consumer is interested in good design, and it gives designers an opportunity to reach a broader audience — if it's right for the business, and it's not right for everybody's businesses.

    How did you get into fashion?
    SK: I really didn't get into fashion, I got into not-for-profit management. That's why I got this job — not because I have any fashion experience or interest in fashion.

    Would you call yourself a fashion person?
    SK: By default, yes, because I work here and it gives me knowledge and access to things I might not otherwise have. But I've said many times, when I leave the CFDA and I never go to another fashion show, that's OK. I won't go through any kind of major withdrawal, I'll sail quietly and contently into the sunset.

    How did you get the CFDA job then?
    SK: Before the CFDA, I worked at MTV International helping a foundation called the Staying Alive Foundation, which was focused on HIV/AIDS. They were interviewing a lot of fashion people — fashion PR, fashion marketing, but not anyone who was really resonating. I loved my MTV job and had no interest in leaving it, but I went and met with the committee. It was Diane and [former CFDA President] Stan Herman, a few others, and it was really relaxed. I talked about what I would or wouldn't do, I didn't overthink it. And after that meeting I got Diane's email, I said thank you, she emailed me right back: "We love you." Three words.

    So why do you think they chose you?
    SK: The last question asked in the interview was by her. She said, "What's your sign?" And I said, "I'm a Libra." They closed their notebooks and offered me the job, I guess, because I was a Libra?

    Do you have any other good stories about Diane?
    SK: She's been a phenomenal friend and partner. The great thing about Diane is she's the most accessible person I've ever met, and you'd think she'd be the least accessible person. She's on email and iPad all the time — she really is a hands-on president of the CFDA. Sometimes I'll go to her office in the Meatpacking District, and they're like, "Diane wants you to go up to the glass dome" [where she has an apartment]. I love going up there, but she'll be getting ready and she'll be like, "Should I wear this bracelet or this necklace?" And she'll pick the one I don't pick. Meeting with her while she's getting ready, it's intimate but we get a lot of stuff done. I still get anxious about it.

    And her term as CFDA president must be nearly over, no?
    SK: Diane was already re-elected twice — more than the bylaws allowed. We changed them, so she'll finish up at eight years in office. She goes through the end of 2014. I think by the end of 2014, she'll be ready to do other stuff, though she'll always be involved. But there'll be an election and the board members who are interested in that position will state that very soon. We'll go through that very private process and then have a big press event. It's a desirable position; I think people are going to want it. Who that will be I will not speculate with you.


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    Into the Gloss is known for its inside look at the beauty routines of the fashion industry’s most revered members. Its founding editor talks about how she turned her passion project into a full-time job and successful business.

    Emily Weiss.

    In this "How I Made It in Fashion" series, BuzzFeed Fashion asks the industry's most successful members how they got to where they are. Ahead, the founder of the highly influential beauty site Into the Gloss, Emily Weiss, explains how she went from blogging at 4 in the morning to running her website full-time.

    I've loved fashion since I was around 9 or 10. I remember writing letters to the editors at Vogue and I remember one was published. It's not like my family works in fashion. My mom isn't particularly interested in clothes or makeup, so I'm really not sure where I got it from. I grew up in Connecticut, and on the first day of sixth grade — conservative Connecticut public school, where lacrosse and field hockey were big — I showed up in thigh-high stockings, a plaid miniskirt from Contempo Casuals, and loafers, and I had a feather-topped pen. The entire Clueless look.

    I wouldn't even say that I had the best style. I was always really interested in trends and trying everything. I had a skater phase where I would wear JNCOs. And I've always been sort of theatrical. I was a theater nerd in high school, so I always really liked dressing up in characters. I never really minded if I wasn't fitting in. I don't really think I could control it.

    I actually interned, when I was 15, with Ralph Lauren in women's design. Obviously I didn't have design training, but I was just happy to help — with coffee, copies, whatever they needed.

    I've developed an encyclopedic knowledge, I would say, of models and stylists, and, at this point, hair and makeup artists. In terms of who's working now, who was big in the '90s — over the last 15 to 20 years, I definitely tracked who was doing what, even on magazine mastheads. I just always have been really interested in people, and I think that's a lot of why I'm doing Into the Gloss and why it's so much about other people. It's not really about me.

    I felt like I needed to be in New York City, which is why I went to NYU. I majored in studio art, though I was never a great student because I always wanted to work. When I was at NYU I interned at Teen Vogue for two and a half years. I was in the fashion closet and did everything from checking in samples to going to Starbucks to helping with returns. Then I was really lucky to meet Jane Keltner de Valle, who worked in fashion features, and then went to that department and interned with her.

    Then they wanted to make me a contributor because I was writing some things — mostly things that I had pitched. There was a feature called "Model Scout" — I remember I wrote something on Sasha Pivovarova and Irina Lazareanu. I didn't really go to ideas meetings, because if I had an idea I would always just tell Jane; I think you're only as good as your ideas. (At Into the Gloss we encourage our interns and our editors and everyone to have an idea for something.)

    After I graduated NYU, I worked at W. I was a fashion assistant, calling in clothes for the shoots. It wasn't for me — I realized very quickly that I really wanted to be part of the shoots, even if it was just packing things.

    Then I wound up assisting Elissa Santisi who was the style director at Vogue just as she was going freelance. We pulled for American Vogue, for runway shows — it was a great education and experience. We went to Dubai, we went to L.A. a bunch of times. I had always been just as excited about beauty as I have been about clothes. My approach to beauty had been based on recommendations from a lot of people around me at work — the makeup artists, the hairstylists, the models, the fashion assistants. And for me, that's the most exciting way to learn about something new — you don't just grab it off the shelf because you read the back of a little bottle. You probably heard about it from somebody who liked it. And I always thought, well, who better to trust and whose better brain to pick than Guido [the hairstylist] or Gucci Westman [the makeup artist]?

    I was with Elissa for two and a half years. I started Into The Gloss during that time, in September of 2010. I had the idea in August — I wanted to see something about beauty, just as a reader. I felt there was something missing in both print and digital, and digital happened to be the thing I could do the most quickly and easily and cheaply. I was reading Jak and Jil and the Sartorialist and I was just shocked because everyone was just [looking at style] from the head down — not treating beauty as part of style in a huge way, but sort of as the kid sister, the afterthought.


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    Meanwhile, the fashion industry cheered wildly at the prospect of her running for president in 2016.

    Hillary Clinton at the CFDA Awards.

    Via: Theo Wargo / Getty Images

    Hillary Clinton was the unquestionable star of the Council of Fashion Designers of America's annual award show in New York Monday night. While most presenters and award winners and even the night's host Andy Cohen, the executive vice president of Bravo who also presides over Watch What Happens Live, struggled to get even a semblance of laughter out of the crowd of designers, fashion editors, and celebrities, Clinton absolutely killed them with her pantsuit jokes.

    "I'm going to be pitching Andy on a new show for Bravo," Clinton said in her remarks introducing Oscar de la Renta, upon whom she was asked to bestow the night's Founders Award. "We can call it Project Pantsuit."

    Clad in a navy beaded pantsuit with a relaxed, pajama-like cut by de la Renta, Clinton recalled meeting the designer for the first time at the 1993 Kennedy Center Honors, which she hosted at the White House with her husband. "There was a receiving line in the White House, and people were coming through, and they were making small talk and exchanging pleasantries, and along came Oscar and Annette, his fabulous wife. So I reached out to shake Oscar's hand and he looked me up and down and said, 'That's one of my dresses.' I said, 'Really?'" (Here, the audience laughed.)

    "I was then, as I am now, such a fashion icon," Clinton joked, to more laughter. "So I said, 'Really? Well you know, I bought it to wear for this occasion. And he said, 'Turn around," The audience hanging on her words like she was about to announce big plans for 2016, Clinton remembered thinking, "Oh my god, I'm being, like, examined by Oscar de la Renta.' But it started a great friendship."

    CFDA president Diane Von Furstenberg, who does charitable work with Clinton, asked her to present the award to de la Renta. When de la Renta came on stage to accept his award from Clinton, he opened his remarks with: "I hope she's going to be our next president." The crowd burst into cheers and applause, as Clinton stood by de la Renta's side, grinning. (Should Clinton move back into the White House, she'd surely bring along plenty of Oscar de la Renta clothes, which she's always favored but which past CFDA Fashion Icon Award recipient Michelle Obama has notably never publicly worn.)

    Though she used to get routinely slammed for her pantsuits, scrunchies, and other hair accessories, Clinton's presence at these very fashion-y fashion awards — they're known as the Oscars of fashion — hardly felt out of place. Over the course of her political career, she's successfully drawn attention away from her clothes while finding some of her biggest supporters in the industry that creates the most cutting-edge attire in the country: the blatantly left-leaning fashion crowd. At the CFDA Awards, Clinton's clothes weren't something she felt the need to downplay, but finally something she could start to have fun with. The way Michelle Obama does, only, well, different.

    "Project Pantsuit is totally a go," said Andy Cohen when he retook the stage. "Madeleine Albright is doing the first challenge."

    Clinton with Oscar de la Renta.

    Via: Theo Wargo / Getty Images


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    Michael Kors’ head was Photoshopped onto Kate Moss’ body, and MORE MAYHEM from one of fashion’s most serious nights — the annual CFDA Awards.

    1. Diane von Furstenberg and Linda Fargo arrived wearing more cutouts between them than you'd find in a couple of J.Lo's Zuhair Murad jumpsuits.

    1. Diane von Furstenberg and Linda Fargo arrived wearing more cutouts between them than you'd find in a couple of J.Lo's Zuhair Murad jumpsuits.

    Via: Bryan Bedder / Getty Images

    DVF was also wearing fishnets and clear heels, throwing major shade in the established norms of "age-appropriate" dressing (i.e., save your Eileen Fisher for the plane). And you know what? They were two of the best-dressed of the night, showing that women actually look better in their cutouts when they're not fashion-model age, which the media would never have you believe.

    Linda Fargo.

    Source: instagram.com  /  via: instagram.com

    2. Kanye West made a cameo in an awkwardly serious video vignette.

    2. Kanye West made a cameo in an awkwardly serious video vignette.

    Via: Bryan Bedder / Getty Images


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    Galliano gave the exclusive post-“I love Hitler” interview to Vanity Fair . At long last, the internet’s most talented cats are able to act out the story through his words.

    "[I]t sounds a bit bizarre, but I am so grateful for what did happen. I have learned so much about myself. I have re-discovered that little boy who had the hunger to create, which I think I had lost. I am alive."

    "[I]t sounds a bit bizarre, but I am so grateful for what did happen. I have learned so much about myself. I have re-discovered that little boy who had the hunger to create, which I think I had lost. I am alive."

    "I lived in a bubble. I would be backstage and there would be a queue of five people to help me. One person would have a cigarette for me. The next person would have the lighter. "

    "I lived in a bubble. I would be backstage and there would be a queue of five people to help me. One person would have a cigarette for me. The next person would have the lighter. "

    "I did not know how to use the A.T.M."

    "I did not know how to use the A.T.M."

    "Not having washed (after losing days to drinking), I’d be covered in sores and humiliated."

    "Not having washed (after losing days to drinking), I’d be covered in sores and humiliated."


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    While wearing… maxi skirts!!!!

    This video introduced the nominees for the CFDA Award for menswear at the ceremony in New York Monday night. So, the models are not only issuing stellar musical performances but also honing their craft: wearing clothes.

    The best part of this video, in my opinion, is the end when Thom Browne's guys come on wearing square Amish-y hats and maxi skirts and cropped suit jackets. It just shows that Pharrell has clearly been dressing all wrong for this.


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    “In the seventies, men wore tight trousers that highlighted the outline of their manhood,” she writes. “More recently, however, the idea of male sexual display has been usurped by gay culture, and as a result, straight men today are rarely so explicit.” Her overall point is that women like her think about sex a lot. This all makes… no sense.

    LINK: Vogue.com Posts Sex Article By Blogger "Slutever"

    "In the seventies, men wore tight trousers that highlighted the outline of their manhood," she writes. "More recently, however, the idea of male sexual display has been usurped by gay culture, and as a result, straight men today are rarely so explicit." Knee-jerk outrage, anyone?


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    Either that or she just stormed through the doors with her Instagram photographer and demanded the keys to Coco’s apartment.

    Rihanna's day in Paris began with the delivery of this neon plastic Chanel bag, which is sure to go with every outfit.

    Rihanna's day in Paris began with the delivery of this neon plastic Chanel bag, which is sure to go with every outfit.

    Source: web.stagram.com

    She was also gifted the keys to Coco Chanel's legendary apartment.

    She was also gifted the keys to Coco Chanel's legendary apartment.

    Or is that just one of Rihanna's belts stuck in the doorframe? Instagram filters make these things so hard to tell.

    Source: web.stagram.com

    Once inside, Rihanna went straight for the staircase. Her Instagram photographers positioned themselves at various points around the building to properly capture the mega fuss this moment would create.

    Once inside, Rihanna went straight for the staircase. Her Instagram photographers positioned themselves at various points around the building to properly capture the mega fuss this moment would create.

    Source: instagram.com

    Rihanna posed on the stairs, as you would.

    Rihanna posed on the stairs, as you would.

    Her expression suggested concern that she wasn't looking seductive enough.

    Source: web.stagram.com


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    Without photoshop getting in the way, we can see just how similar these young women look without retouching. So, is plastic surgery or just a pervasive culture of conformity to blame?

    These 20 women became a viral sensation recently when their promotional headshots for the Miss Korea 2013 beauty pageant revealed their strikingly similar appearances.

    These 20 women became a viral sensation recently when their promotional headshots for the Miss Korea 2013 beauty pageant revealed their strikingly similar appearances.

    Your standard internet everycritic blamed their, well, overlapping appearances on plastic surgery.

    Your standard internet everycritic blamed their, well, overlapping appearances on plastic surgery.

    In a 2009 survey, one in five women in Seoul between the ages of 19 and 49 said they had had some type of cosmetic surgery. From the photos alone, it's difficult to tell how much photoshop might have assimilated the pageant contestants' appearances. But now that the pageant has happened we can begin to answer that question. Photos from the event suggest both photoshop along with a very specific cultural ideal of beauty contributed to the contestants' very similar physical appearances in these photos.

    The pageant included a swimsuit contest, where the contestants performed light synchronized dancing while all wearing the same one-piece and heels.

    The pageant included a swimsuit contest, where the contestants performed light synchronized dancing while all wearing the same one-piece and heels.

    Already this is WAY more conservative than your standard U.S. beauty pageant.

    Via: Chung Sung-Jun / Getty Images

    They changed into dresses the color of seafoam and sang, choir-style.

    They changed into dresses the color of seafoam and sang, choir-style.

    Via: Chung Sung-Jun / Getty Images


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    These surely won’t look good on anyone at all, but they’re at least fun to look at. All by Some Product (and some product, indeed!).

    Karl Lagerfeld-on-the-upper-thigh leggings: $145.

    Karl Lagerfeld-on-the-upper-thigh leggings: $145.

    Source: shop.someproductapparel.com

    For the rare person who at once wants to wear Karl Lagerfeld's face and draw attention to their upper thighs.

    For the rare person who at once wants to wear Karl Lagerfeld's face and draw attention to their upper thighs.

    And spend $175 on leggings.

    (For the record: this person doesn't exist.)

    Source: shop.someproductapparel.com

    Cat leggings: $75

    Cat leggings: $75

    Source: shop.someproductapparel.com

    "Pearl Earring" leggings: $75.

    "Pearl Earring" leggings: $75.

    Girl with the pearl knee ring.

    No one tell Amanda Bynes about this.

    Source: shop.someproductapparel.com


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