Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

BuzzFeed, Find Your New Favorite Thing

older | 1 | .... | 11 | 12 | (Page 13) | 14 | 15 | .... | 27 | newer

    0 0

    Her favorite designer Zuhair Murad just presented his new “couture” collection. Which of the outfits should she wear next?

    If you think you don't know Zuhair Murad, think again. He's the man responsible for this jumpsuit:

    If you think you don't know Zuhair Murad, think again. He's the man responsible for this jumpsuit:

    Image by Scott Barbour / Getty Images

    And THIS jumpsuit:

    And THIS jumpsuit:

    Source: whitneyjefferson

    Along with this alleged dress:

    Along with this alleged dress:

    Image by Michael Buckner / Getty Images

    And this one:

    And this one:

    Image by Jason Merritt / Getty Images


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Relive the glamorous, glorious, Beyoncé-ous pageantry of the week’s big event.

    Source: amyodell

    Sunday, January 20, 8:00 p.m. — I arrive at Illinois Ball at the Marriott Hotel, just down the road from the zoo and completely wild in its own way. The doors of black cars filtering into the driveway ease open to unleash some of the most intense formal attire and outerwear I'll certainly see all year: The women have packed themselves tightly into heavy, stiff taffeta fabrics made weightier by an outer crust of beads and sequins in arresting displays that look less like your typical dress embellishments than metallic tile mosaics. Bedazzled shoe buckles are common, heavy hairspray is an absolute necessity. The overall aesthetic is somewhere north of prom and somewhere south of Miss Universe. And then there's the fur.

    This is the most shameless display of pelts outside of fashion week, where social consciousness in terms of animal products is limited to protesters outside furriers' shows and vanity veganism. I expected a lot of fur this weekend; in 2009 the Wall Street Journal proclaimed that the Obamas had spurred a fur craze in D.C. (The Obamas don't wear fur but, this story argued, had prompted an influx of people to Washington from Chicago, one of our nation's furriest cities, and an influx of African-Americans, who are "disproportionately big fur buyers.") Nonetheless it's still odd to see so much of it on women and men of all ages, and no one minding. And these aren't middling little fur vests you see on 24-year-olds with Starbucks cups and Tory Burch flats — these are big, floor-length, quilts of pelts where you can see one animal hide stop and another begin. A lot of people wearing fur disappear into it entirely so that they resemble beasts with oddly small human heads.

    In the hotel lobby, about 20 people are gathered around a flat-screen TV mounted on the wall, which is playing a football game. (Tickets to this black-tie event are $150.) I notice one man trying to get his face as close to the screen as possible wears a tux with a neon green ruffled shirt. Despite the self-regard one must possess to wear a neon-accented tux, he refuses to have his picture taken by BuzzFeed's photographer.

    Entering the ballroom I'm slapped in the face by an intense odor of smoked meats. Carving stations positioned around the ballroom have grown long lines of people who I suspect did not spend this much time getting dressed to stand in a line holding a plate to collect carved sirloin, smoked pork, a bun, and some sauce.

    Guests can also get their picture taken by a man wearing all black with a red, white, and blue American flag necktie. The photos he takes superimpose their image over one of President Obama with an extended hand, so the end result makes it look like they're "shaking" Obama's hand.

    Some of the tables are sponsored and display signs that say exciting things like "Illinois Pipe Trades" and "Charles Smith Insurance Strategies." Four huge movie screens positioned on one wall of this giant room display a slideshow of pixelated images of Illinois politicians' faces mixed in with ball sponsor logos.

    No one seems terribly drunk here, probably because the lines for the bars are so long. But that doesn't stop people from flooding onto the dance floor when a woman in a red sequined top and matching red silky skirt takes the mic on stage and asks, "You all ready to get this party cracking?" This crowd apparently is, and rushes the stage with iPhones up to take pictures they'll undoubtedly post to Facebook or Instagram so that everyone knows they were at a ball, pretending to shake the president's hand and witnessing live music.

    I ask a group of ladies lingering on a staircase balcony over empty plates, cocktail glasses, and crumpled napkins how they ended up here. They're from the D.C. area, not Illinois, but explain they thought the Obamas might show up here because they're from Illinois. Despite the president's inaugural schedule (two balls on Monday night, that's it) being widely publicized, the belief that the president could just turn up anywhere at any moment is a widely held one. People seem to forget that the guy isn't Beyoncé — he can't just show up at any old mall, put on a surprise show, and become a YouTube sensation. But at inauguration weekend, people are awfully willing to suspend disbelief.

    Scenes from the Illinois ball.

    Source: maceyjforonda

    Sunday, January 20, 10:00 p.m. — The hip-hop inaugural ball, organized by Russell Simmons, is being held in a theater in the heart of D.C.'s sprawling inauguration traffic jam. I'm late but they let me take a seat inside anyway, where I realize this isn't really a ball as much as an arbitrary awards ceremony, where various people in the hip-hop community perform and accept trophies that look like microphones made of glass.

    When I sit down a preview for a Jadakiss movie is playing, for reasons that are unclear to me. After that a woman wearing sequins and a blazer takes the stage to sing a song with the lyric "sex so good." And then! Heineken — the logo on everyone's admitting wristband — is given a "community catalyst" award, which is accepted on stage by Heineken's president, who says something too boring for me to write in my notes.

    Angela Simmons comes on next to present John Legend with a "humanitarian award." We're treated to a vignette about Legend's support of "innovative educational reform" and work to lift people out of "extreme poverty." Legend accepts the award personally, telling the audience, "I'm really grateful for hip-hop and the role that it's played in society." This wouldn't be a political event without sentences like these.

    Lil' Mama takes the stage to sing a portion of everyone's favorite spin class song, "Lip Gloss," and the audience seems so underwhelmed by her presence that I'm at first not even sure if this is actually her — the real America's Best Dance Crew judge Lil' Mama — or someone doing a cover of her. She then comes back on stage again and does a fantastic rap that ends dramatically with the words "I ball," and causes everyone to burst into cheers. I can't decide if I'm more captivated by her performance or turquoise snakeskin ankle boots that are so tall, I want to rush the stage and give her a helmet.

    After MC Lyte is awarded a glass microphone for "lifetime achievement," an announcer introduces "hip-hop's favorite academic" Michael Eric Dyson, a Georgetown professor and prolific author, who takes the stage to introduce Swizz Beats, recipient of the "impact" award. Dyson tells the crowd that "without Busta Rhymes, Barack Obama couldn't bust a rhyme." Swizz Beats then takes the stage and talks about the work he's done in Africa, where he bore witness to extreme poverty and realized "your problems are other people's dreams."

    He closed his speech with "Haters, like, 2012. Positive energy is 2013."

    Monday, January 21, 9:30 a.m. — After a half hour drive, an hour walking aimlessly through big crowds in the National Mall, and roughly another hour at security, I've made my way to my front row seat at the inauguration ceremony!!! I'm in the section below the podium, so I won't be able to see everyone up there, but I will be able to see the head of anyone speaking at the podium. The angle at which I'm positioned will give me a great up-nose shot.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0
  • 01/28/13--08:00: Ditch Your Bras!
  • Rihanna's first clothing line is here!

    In this video, Rihanna talks about her forthcoming clothing line for British chain River Island.

    The important thing about this footage, which consists mostly of Rihanna uttering platitudes about style, is that it offers glimpses of what the clothing line will look like.

    Sideboob looks to feature prominently.

    Sideboob looks to feature prominently.

    Rihanna is depicted motioning in the sideboob area of what seems like a bra-friendly dress.

    Rihanna is depicted motioning in the sideboob area of what seems like a bra-friendly dress.

    (The skirt of this is sheer.)


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    With no pants, of course.

    Kate Upton is the new face of the Sam Edelman shoe ads. I present you the photos for no reason other than you're still shamelessly not tired of looking at her.

    Kate Upton is the new face of the Sam Edelman shoe ads. I present you the photos for no reason other than you're still shamelessly not tired of looking at her.

    Source: huffingtonpost.com

    Source: huffingtonpost.com

    Source: huffingtonpost.com


    0 0

    The Glee ladies took a turn for the worse but Anne Hathaway made it impossible for us to see up her skirt, so YAY! Don't you just love awards season?

    Worst Bondage Glam: Jane Lynch

    Worst Bondage Glam: Jane Lynch

    This is two dresses stuck together — goth princess on the bottom and suburban 50 Shades of Grey theme party up top. If she had picked one angle and just gone with it, she'd have likely wound up in Tina Fey's consistently inoffensive corner of the best-/worst-dressed lists instead of what ended up being the SAG Awards' Glee abyss.

    Image by Adrees Latif / Reuters

    Most Boring: Lea Michele

    Most Boring: Lea Michele

    This is not a great red-carpet look, but it's not completely awful either, placing it on the lower end of passable that is worse, to me, than all-out bad outfits that at least reek of character if not fashion. But if you're going to wear a huge pink prom dress, just go for a full-on LOOK and spray your hair into a crusty bouffant instead of making it look like a bad memory of 2011.

    Image by Adrees Latif / Reuters

    Most Perplexing Neckline: Carmen Electra

    Most Perplexing Neckline: Carmen Electra

    One of the girls wanted to come out, but the other one just wasn't quite ready.

    Image by Adrees Latif / Reuters

    Safest Choice: Jessica Chastain

    Safest Choice: Jessica Chastain

    This is an Alexander McQueen dress, but it's McQueen in the way Kate Middleton's stuff is — you don't know it's McQueen until someone tells you because she's an actress and therefore not "supposed" to look too edgy.

    Image by The Associated Press / AP


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    He answered questions from fans in today's #asklochte special. Our favorite Olympian proved insightful, as always.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Rachel Zoe's baby is hardy the most fashionable kid on the internet. Ladys & Gents showcases the best of kid style with all user-submitted photos.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    The Kate Middleton For The Win blogger is back with new memes in honor of the year's most important news story.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    I love Lena Dunham, really I do. But enough already.

    Lena Dunham is on the new cover of Entertainment Weekly, with a headline calling her "the voice of a generation."

    Lena Dunham is on the new cover of Entertainment Weekly, with a headline calling her "the voice of a generation."

    Source: popwatch.ew.com

    Obviously she's been slapped with that label before — in Glamour:

    Obviously she's been slapped with that label before — in Glamour:

    Dunham was one of the magazine's "Women of the Year" for 2012.

    The Wall Street Journal:

    The Wall Street Journal:

    And The Daily Beast:

    And The Daily Beast:


    View Entire List ›


    0 0
  • 01/31/13--10:30: Making Over Michelle Dockery
  • I love anyone or anything that has even a remote connection to Downton Abbey . But sometimes I really want to dress “Mary Crawley” in someone else's clothes.

    In January of 2012, Michelle Dockery sat front row at the Armani Prive couture show in Paris, affirming her status as a fashion person.

    In January of 2012, Michelle Dockery sat front row at the Armani Prive couture show in Paris, affirming her status as a fashion person.

    I know her outfit must be Armani Prive couture, but it looks like any old mediocre pantsuit.

    Image by Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

    And she got a ticket to the Met Gala! Which reeks of fashion industry acceptance.

    And she got a ticket to the Met Gala! Which reeks of fashion industry acceptance.

    But she showed up wearing this oddly dowdy half-metal dress. Why? With Vogue editors to dress her and everything?

    Image by Larry Busacca / Getty Images

    She enjoyed the backing of Burberry in June.

    She enjoyed the backing of Burberry in June.

    As a front row guest at their menswear show, she got to wear one of their owl tees and be generally fawned over for for it.

    Image by Jacopo Raule / Getty Images

    But this dress, worn in July, is about as memorable as anything Lady Edith wears.

    But this dress, worn in July, is about as memorable as anything Lady Edith wears.

    Which is to say not memorable at all.

    Image by Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Members plan to take a stand against unpaid internships first in New York, then London and Paris.

    Hi ho, Fashion Week!

    Intern Labor Rights, a division of the Occupy Wall Street movement, plans to protest unpaid internships at New York Fashion Week, which will draws hordes of international media and industry members to the city when it begins on February 7. The protest is still in the planning stages, but organizers expect to have a visible presence at fashion show venues Friday, February 8 through Sunday February 10. Demonstrations will also take place at subsequent London and Paris Fashion Weeks.

    "Quite frankly, we're getting such an outpouring of interest that it's growing exponentially as we speak," protest organizer Peter Walsh said of the first protests in New York. "I don't think there'll be hundreds — I don't think it's going to be that big, but we'd like to have a significant presence."

    Walsh said group members were still in the process of determining where exactly the demonstrations will take place at New York Fashion Week to maximize visibility. The group is planning to hand out swag bags, including a tote and pin that say "pay your interns."

    "The fashion industry really relies on this culture of selling an image that includes, in many ways, this image of the put-upon intern," said Eric Glatt, who's working on the Fashion Week protests and suing Fox Searchlight for improper compensation for his work on Black Swan. "Whenever it's at a for-profit institution the worker legally needs to be compensated." The department of labor has six criteria for what can contstitute an unpaid internship, including: "The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded." Protest organizers have not connected with high-ranking members of the fashion industry in New York.

    "The fashion industry is a for-profit industry — it's not like they're working not-for-profit arts organizations. They're making billions of dollars and the fact that they're asking their students to donate their labor to these businesses is really outrageous," Walsh said. "We're trying to persuade people and educate people at the same time."

    Plans for the protests only started about ten days ago, after the idea came up in an informal Skype conference that included intern advocacy groups from seven countries around the world. Among them, Génération-Précaire in Paris and SUARTS in London specifically inspired Intern Labor Rights to target fashion week here, since the fashion industry has been a target of their efforts already. Walsh said Milan — the other major fashion capital with the third fashion week of fashion month — doesn't figure into their protest plans currently because the group lacks connections there.

    The fashion week protests are part of a larger fight for workers' rights across the arts and media industries, which the Occupy movement's Arts & Labor group is focussing on. "We're trying to drive all this unpaid labor out of the arts. Artists contribute enormously," said Walsh, who has a background in visual arts himself. "Whether they're working on a fashion magazine or as a fashion model, everyone deserves to be paid daily." (For the record, a lot of models at New York Fashion Week, don't get paid, even by designers as famous as Marc Jacobs.)

    Organizers expect people from other areas of the arts — film, music, etc. — to participate in the Fashion Week protests as a show of solidarity across the OWS Arts & Labor group. Intern Labor Rights is taking other actions in New York to educate interns about their rights, like passing around flyers that explain the laws governing unpaid internships. "Here in the U.S. I don't know that we need changes of the law, we need enforcement of the law," Walsh said.

    Unpaid internships in the fashion industry gained attention recently after former Harper's Bazaar intern Diana Wang sued Hearst for what she believed to be an inappropriate use of her unpaid services as head accessories intern. (Her case is being handled by the same firm representing Glatt.) Walsh said she's been helping Intern Labor Rights with their Fashion Week efforts, but won't participate in the protests.


    0 0

    A celebrity fragrance!

    This is now...

    This is now...

    Source: wwd.com

    The fragrances for men and women range in price from an absurd $35 to $65, and are available at Macy's, which is where celebrity fragrances go to die. He spoke to WWD about his change of heart:

    "I didn't want it to be another bulls--t celebrity fragrance that I was hocking, that I didn't believe in," he said in a phone interview with WWD. "At the end of the day, I can definitely say I wanted to change the perception of that. On paper, I'm not a fan of the [genre], but I got excited having conversations with ID Perfumes," his fragrance licensee.

    The benchmark he set for himself: "I wanted to do something understated and elegant — something that people I revere in that world, like Tom Ford, would do, and something I'd be attracted to. I like basic fragrances. I didn't want to smell like a department store. And there's an intimacy level that you have to think about. You don't really want someone to smell you unless they're really close to you."

    The staggering interview continued:

    Of acting, he noted, "As far as acting goes, it's going to be on a case-by-case basis. I don't have an agenda, but it's fun to live an adventurous life and try new things, be unafraid — and that's what I'm doing. I don't have this drive to take over the world. But [as far as products go] I'd like to expand on that and offer that creatively. Yes, they're products, and, yes, you're selling something that's well-made and good, and hopefully in good taste."

    Don't most celebrities just give up on the taste thing after about two years? No one minds, evidently.


    0 0
  • 02/06/13--11:22: Finding The Next Bryanboy
  • Becoming a famous fashion blogger is less about peacocking at fashion week than, well, having an actual talent and something new to say.

    Bryanboy at the launch of his collection of fur accessories for Adrienne Landau, Tuesday in New York.

    Image by Slaven Vlasic / Getty Images

    Every fashion week, Jennine Jacob plans the Independent Fashion Bloggers conference. It includes panel discussions and talks with the internet's most successful fashion personalities, and hundreds of unknown fashion bloggers buy tickets to hear their tips on making it big as an online fashion star.

    But just four years into the conference, figuring out which bloggers to invite to speak has become a huge challenge. "It's like, I'll get Susie Bubble and Bryanboy and Fashion Toast, and four years later, I'm like, who are we going to bring on that we haven't brought on before?" Jacob said. (Full disclosure: I have spoken at the IFB conference twice.)

    Fashion blogging is very much in its infancy, relatively speaking, and even the most successful in the field have all expressed an acute awareness of their uncertain future. Print magazines ruled fashion media for more than a century and are just now taking a backseat to internet coverage. So no one knows where these indie blogs — however popular they are now — will lead or how they will evolve.

    When the industry talks about fashion bloggers, they're referring to people with independent sites that create posts about fashion, often not in a purely journalistic context, but by frequently showcasing photos of themselves wearing clothes. A handful of them — the likes of Susie Bubble, Bryan Boy, Fashion Toast, the Man Repeller — have become quite famous, attaining celebrity-like status at fashion week, where they sit front row next to Vogue editors and famous actresses, and draw hordes of street-style photographers wherever they go, as if they're Suri Cruise leaving divorce court.

    "I work hard, but I would say I'm really, really lucky. I'm fully aware that all of it can just disappear in a flash," said Susanna Lau, who blogs as Susie Bubble. Though she was quick to add: "I can't see bloggers disappearing completely off the grid unless they themselves disappear. [But] there's no precedent yet."

    But for a business that craves and makes significant money on constant newness, surprisingly few new fashion bloggers have managed to become as important as the first generation of breakout personalities. Ask most people front row at fashion week, and while they could probably tell you who they think the next hot designer, model, or photographer will be, they likely couldn't tell you who the next Bryanboy will be. The success stories seem so rare, the market so oversaturated, and the medium's future so uncertain, that you have to wonder: Is it even possible to become the next Bryanboy anymore?

    Yes, and no. Major influence like Bryanboy's is theoretically up for anyone's grabs — but it won't be attained in the same way. In this "look at me!" age of social media, a unique willingness to stay behind the scenes seems key as fashion blogs like the Man Repeller offer more and more content more akin to a traditional magazine's. But the majority of people trying to blog their way to the front row probably haven't picked up on that yet.

    Leandra "Man Repeller" Medine modeling an outfit on her site.

    Via: manrepeller.com

    The landscape is completely different from when Susie Bubble and Bryanboy started. To truly break out, the roughly 10 bloggers and blogging experts interviewed for this story agree that people need talents beyond personal-style blogging and the ability to draw the attention of street-style photographers at fashion week. Now the industry and potential followers are hungry for more depth — but finding those flowers amongst the weeds is still incredibly challenging.

    "I think it's really, really difficult," Lau said of trying to break into the field now. "I would not want to be a blogger starting out today. I really don't think I would have done it actually, having known there are so many."

    When Lau started her blog Style Bubble in 2006, fashion bloggers weren't a thing in the industry — or at fashion week — at all, really. But she's gone on to appear in countless fashion magazines and fashion sites, as well as accrue hundreds of thousands of followers. "I've gone to these conferences and panels," Lau said, "and they ask the same questions: How do you get a following? And the truth is, I have no idea."

    She said "it must be possible" to become the next her, "but I think it's getting more difficult, and perhaps there are people starting to blog for the wrong reasons" — meaning, the freebies, the money, and the fabulous life, as opposed to an innate love of fashion and the internet.

    The lifestyle of Lau and her peers, like Bryanboy, does seem appealing; the most successful fashion personalities land lucrative deals to promote brands and appear in ad campaigns, get paid to wear certain labels' clothes to fashion week, and get flown around the world — from Paris to Sao Paolo to Hong Kong — to cover parties and shows. And they get tons of attention for their fabulous outfits every time they show up somewhere.

    The brands themselves get instant exposure to a large fashion-savvy audience. Lau gets 30,000 visitors a day to her blog and has 183,000 followers on Twitter. She and her peers also cover the fashion world from a fan's perspective, meaning brands don't worry about them publishing a negative review, the way a critic might (especially if one of them has been paid to make an appearance). They also give brands something print fashion magazines can't: a direct view into how fans react to their products. And still, a lot of brands are working with bloggers without understanding the benefit of the alliance, while others have decided working with certain bloggers provides no value-add — and would rather spend money on things like custom furniture for a party.

    Jacob, the conference organizer, says that when people get into fashion blogging just for the sake of becoming internet celebrities and getting their photos posted online, "it's very obvious." She added, "If your only objective is to be kind of famous, I don't think you're going to have the longevity to make it [to [Bryanboy's] level" — that is, previewing the top designer collections before fashion week and even joining the cast of America's Next Top Model.


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    I hope you don't like full-size cupcakes.

    People will show up to places in crop tops and no tights in 30-degree weather.

    People will show up to places in crop tops and no tights in 30-degree weather.

    You can pretty much count on comfort to be out of style every season.

    Image by Amy Odell

    Alexa Chung will DJ a party held in a store.

    Alexa Chung will DJ a party held in a store.

    As will the Richards sisters and a random model or two.

    (Pictured: Alexa DJing at the Marni fragrance launch.)

    Image by Amy Odell

    Spiced nuts will be easily confused with cat food.

    Spiced nuts will be easily confused with cat food.

    Image by Amy Odell

    People will party after every single little thing.

    People will party after every single little thing.

    There are after-parties for fashion shows, the release of new perfumes, new liquors, old liquors, new handbag lines, jewelry lines... Someone's going to go to the bathroom one day and have an after-party for that, of this I'm certain.

    Via: racked.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    “I hope the show contributes to a continuance of feminist dialogue,” Dunham said.

    Image by Museum of Fine Arts

    Don't tell Lena Dunham she's the "voice of her generation."

    The Girls creator and star says that line, from the pilot episode of her hit HBO show, follows her around wherever she goes.

    "I don't think I ever imagined that it would haunt me the way it is," said Dunham Wednesday at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, where she appeared at a discussion with her mother, artist Laurie Simmons. "The character was on opium! I think the 'voice of a generation' concept was lost with beatnik literature. Because of globalization and increasing populations, my generation kind of consists of so many different voices that need so many different kinds of attention. But if my writing can show what it's like to be young, I'm happy."

    The discussion, titled "A Voice of Two Generations," gave an inside look at the creative processes of Dunham and her mother, and the unique childhood that inspired Dunham's evolution into a creative tour de force. Growing up in New York City, Dunham was constantly going through different phases, ranging from rescuing rabbits to being the first "ballerina-pig farmer." At 14, she asked for stand-up comedy lessons for Christmas.

    Her opening line?

    "Hi, I'm 14, and I'm an alcoholic. Just kidding, my father is," her mother remembered, laughing.

    "It was the pits," said Dunham. "We lost the video of me in purple capri pants and a matching jacket talking about kids at school."

    Lena says the inherent sense of self-confidence that allows her to portray young women so realistically on Girls is a direct result of how her parents raised her.

    "I feel like I was raised in an environment where I was sort of given a clear message that what we were seeing in the media wasn't an actual reflection of what a woman is or what a woman should be. I try to not get too didactic or political using my body, but it's been interesting seeing the diverse reactions to the show, because it speaks so closely to our country's relation with the woman's body. The foreign press has a different reaction. This is a very American reaction. The cultures with more bathhouses are more comfortable," Lena said, laughing.

    When Lena was young, Simmons worked in a photo studio that had previously shot Gwyneth Paltrow for a fashion spread. Laurie noticed several discarded photographs on the ground, each showing Paltrow's un-retouched face, covered in blemishes. Simmons brought the photos home to show her daughters that what's in the magazines isn't reality.

    "I said, 'Look, I want you to see what happens. Please understand what happens in the magazines,'" Simmons told the crowd.

    Of all the questions Dunham is most frequently asked, she says there's one that constantly pops up: Does she consider herself to be a feminist? It's a concept, Dunham says, that is not up for debate.

    "The idea of post-feminism is so broken because it implies that the work of feminism is over," said Dunham. "The idea of being a feminist — so many women have come to this idea of it being anti-male and not able to connect with opposite sex… But what feminism is is about equality and human rights. For me that is just an essential part of my identity. I hope the show contributes to a continuance of feminist dialogue."

    The maturity with which Dunham responds to the media's negative criticism of her work has left a lasting impression on her mother. "There's a lot of that. It's not just somebody writing a nasty review in The New York Times on Friday. It's 1 million mothers saying, 'I don't like your hair, your dress,'" she said. "For Lena to see two artists whose lives were a series of peaks and valleys, where a show opens where not one work sells and one person writes a negative review, for Lena to see that is to help her grapple with the criticism that comes her way."

    But along with the heavy criticism comes the legions of fans who hope to follow in Dunham's path.

    "That's the piece of advice I always give when kids or adults approach me saying, 'I want to write and I want to know what your tip is for breaking through and making people read your work,'" Dunham told the crowd. "To never fit yourself into a mold of what you think Hollywood needs, what NBC needs in its 9:30 slot. The more you go into your own experience, if you express your truth, it's going to resonate with someone."

    Via: http://Museum%20of%20Fine%20Arts


    0 0

    Not viral in the sense that everyone was sick — but in the sense that NO ONE could resist tweeting about this thing.

    Target held a mammoth party in honor of the Prabal Gurung for Target collection that included everything Instagram was made for. Including, Ne-Yo performing in a hot orange blazer, sequin scarf, and fedora.

    Target held a mammoth party in honor of the Prabal Gurung for Target collection that included everything Instagram was made for. Including, Ne-Yo performing in a hot orange blazer, sequin scarf, and fedora.

    No one can resist Instagraming a celebrity — or even non-famous, outlandishly dressed people — wearing a fedora.

    Source: gramfeed.com

    In acknowledgment of his status as a walking Instagram, he wore his hat on his forehead.

    In acknowledgment of his status as a walking Instagram, he wore his hat on his forehead.

    Instead of the top of his head, the way normal people wear hats.

    Source: gramfeed.com

    The party was a giant carnival, RIDES included.

    The party was a giant carnival, RIDES included.

    The biggest ride was this thing that was made of two metal cages that spun around really fast with people inside.

    Source: gramfeed.com

    They strapped you in standing up like this. It all seemed like a very bad idea for a party that served wine.

    Source: gramfeed.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    They served as the basis for a show that is what every person who fancies themselves terribly cool will want to wear next winter.

    Image by Mark Von Holden / Getty Images

    The Kimberly Ovitz show can pride itself on at least two things: some of New York fashion week's most unique, sculptural hair and what ought to be some of the best show notes of the week. They read:

    THROUGH OBSERVING THE HUMAN PSYCHE AND NATURAL DEFENSES THAT MANIFEST MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY, OVITZ EXPLORED THE INTRICACIES OF THE ILLUSIONAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS SEEN IN ANIMALS AND INSECTS. TRAPUNTO STITCHING ON ANGULAR OUTERWEAR MIMICS THE SEGMENTED ABDOMENTS OF SPECIES PROTECTED BY EXOSKELETONS, WHILE STIFF COATED COTTON SCULPTS OUTERWEAR AND CONTRASTS WITH SOFT, FAUX SHEARLING LINING. SIGNATURE BODY-CON STYLES INCORPORATE RAISED SEAMS THAT CONTOUR AND ACCENTUATE NATURAL CURVES. OTHERWORDLY [sic] COLORS SEEN ON CREATURES LIKE POISON DART FROGS AND ANEMONES ARE EXPRESSED IN A BOLD PALETTE OF LAVA, LAGOON, LAPIS, SULFUR, AND EMBER, GROUNDED BY THE FOUNDATION OF GRAPHITE, COPPER, ZINC, AND ARACHNID. HALLUCINATORY PRINTS ROUND OUT THE COLLECTION, INSPIRED BY MICROSCOPIC VIEWS OF SCALES, EXOSKELETONS AND SQUID INK, ECHOING NATURE'S ELUSIVE DEFENSE MECHANISMS, KIMBERLY OVITZ CREATES AN EMPOWERING BALANCE OF LIGHT AND DARK FOR THE AUTUMN/WINTER 2013 COLLECTION.

    Got that?

    Ovitz said she studied "animals' natural defense mechanisms" including the exoskeletons of beetles and the poisonous skin of dart frogs.

    Image by Mark Von Holden / Getty Images

    Image by Charles Tilford via Creative Commons


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    Despite the abysmal weather, nothing at fashion week has been canceled — leaving everyone at the shows in a state of denial about the impending doom. (At least, judging by their shoes.)

    By wearing fur vests.

    By wearing fur vests.

    I saw more fur vests at Fashion Week today than I've seen on just about every Bravo show, ever.

    Source: gramfeed.com

    Source: gramfeed.com

    And fur hats.

    And fur hats.

    This one is Thakoon. Because if it wasn't it wouldn't be at Fashion Week.

    Source: gramfeed.com

    By wearing a leopard blanket with a fur hood.

    By wearing a leopard blanket with a fur hood.

    And looking scared. Because the blizzard is frightful, truly.

    Source: gramfeed.com


    View Entire List ›


    0 0

    This may be the most genius nude fashion editorial of the century.

    The theme of new issue of CR Fashion Book, hitting newsstands in the U.S. February 28, is dance. Editor Carine Roitfeld assembled a group astounding images featuring dancers and models. This editorial, called "Clearly," is meant to showcase clear fashion accessories. Because you're going to look at this and look at the shoes and the clutch purse, right?

    Image by Brigitte Niedermair for CR Fashion Book

    Right.


    0 0

    Just one of the many problems that can arise when designers popularize something like neon.

    On Friday at New York Fashion Week, Jason Wu presented a lovely (dare I say FLOTUS-worthy) show. The runway was arranged in a square around a giant chandelier that flickered rhythmically with the music. This meant that when photographers shot the clothes as they came down the runway, audience members couldn't help but be included in the shot.

    Image by Bebeto Matthews / AP

    Considering Wu's fall 2013 color palette included a lot of black and white, if you were wearing, oh I don't know — NEON and sitting behind the models, you kind of stood out.

    Considering Wu's fall 2013 color palette included a lot of black and white, if you were wearing, oh I don't know — NEON and sitting behind the models, you kind of stood out.

    Can you spot the neon in this photo?

    Image by Slaven Vlasic / Getty Images

    Here's a fuller view of the eye-catching pants.

    Here's a fuller view of the eye-catching pants.

    Aren't the runway clothes so pretty, though??

    Image by Slaven Vlasic / Getty Images

    And a complete view of the neon pants wearer.

    And a complete view of the neon pants wearer.

    Who is perfectly apparently in many runway images from the show.

    Image by Slaven Vlasic / Getty Images


    View Entire List ›


older | 1 | .... | 11 | 12 | (Page 13) | 14 | 15 | .... | 27 | newer